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Remembered Today:

Indian Memorial, Somme


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David Filsell

Why should we applaud the second rate pray? It's not simply a question of being an armchair critic, simply a question of recognising and criticising that which which we judge second rate.

Edited by David Filsell
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Hedley Malloch
2 hours ago, David Filsell said:

Why should we applaud the second rate pray? It's not simply a question of being an armchair critic, simply a question of recognising and criticising that which which we judge second rate.

 

Because the best can be the enemy of the good. Sometimes the second rate is better than nothing.

 

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13 hours ago, Tom Tulloch-Marshall said:

 

Sometimes it would be better to do nothing rather than produce something which really doesn't achieve what might have been intended. As for "Conceptual art is about the concept - not about the finished product" rather sounds to me like "We knew what we wanted to achieve but unfortunately we didn't have the skill to do it." Having looked closely at the Indian Memorial I rather suspect it won't be there in 25 years time - looks like its made of plastic.

 

BTW - I've always liked Gormley's 'Angel of the North', and his "Another Place" statues which interface with the sea are quite striking / attractive. They are up there with the "conceptionally clever" and very well executed Mametz Dragon.

Tom

At least they have made an effort. As I said, it’ s easy be be an armchair  critic. 
 

TR
 

 

 

 

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Ted Bates statue

Is the statue of Ted Drake still there in Southampton?

Seems that Ted's proportions are very similar to the Indian Memorial figures'.

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Steven Broomfield

Not that one. It was so appalling that it was removed and replaced with something that actually looked like the subject.

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David Filsell

Apologies, but-second best remains just that - as evidenced on this thread. Of course it's easy to be an armchair, or any other kind of critic. But , poor work remains poor even if it's made of gold whatever it celebrates. Second rate is never better than nothing in my opinion.

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Tom Tulloch-Marshall
11 hours ago, Terry_Reeves said:

As I said, it’ s easy be be an armchair  critic. 

 

I have to presume that you were sitting in your armchair when you typed that.

Tom

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Yes, but I have chaired a committee which has raised funds to restore a memorial from which the bronze plaques were stolen and took an active part in the organisation of fund raising and numerous visits to the foundry. 

 

48 minutes ago, Tom Tulloch-Marshall said:

 

I have to presume that you were sitting in your armchair when you typed that.

Tom

No armchair soldier here.

 

TR

Edited by Terry_Reeves
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Hindu, Buddhist and Sikh figurative art tends to be hierarchic as in the 19thc  example here.  The important people depicted larger and more elaborately than those considered  unimportant. Status precedes any sense of realism. This can often lend images a cartoonish air.  Also there was an imprecise interpretation of perspective.  This is one strand of figurative art from the Indian Sub-Continent. The other is Mughal miniatures based upon Sh'ite Persian prototypes.  These are also hierarchic and usually highly decorative.  By the 18thc the Mughal court was more influenced by Western art and perspective creeps in.

Gouache.jpg

Edited by Hyacinth1326
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