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bomberdier frankish

1914-15 stars

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bomberdier frankish

Evening

 

I was wondering if some one could advise me. I was wondering perhaps what you need to look for in a mons or a 1915 star to see if they're genuine or a replica, usually with the victory and british war medal you can see the initials underneath the kings neck or at the side etc but other than looking at the wreath I don't know how you'd be able to tell via a photograph

 

Thanks

 

Bomberdier frankish 

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RNCVR
Posted (edited)

Northeast Medals has a good site on medals, naming, how to tell repros etc.

 

Will see if I can post a link for you,

 

Best....Bryan

Edited by RNCVR

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RNCVR
bomberdier frankish

cheers bryan

 

I've had a look on north east medals and the guide but the medal iv'e been offered is unnamed at the rear so it's a bit hard to tell i'll attach a photo if that helps

mons star.jpg

mons rear.jpg

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The Inspector
Posted (edited)

Hi

Without a name on the reverse and the look of the medal I would say it is a repro. See   https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/medals/1914-star   

Regards Barry

Edited by The Inspector

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RNCVR

Both star & clasp are repros frankish,

 

Best....Bryan

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collectorsguide

There were 16 firms manufacturing the 14/15 stars so production values ie weight ,colour,definition etc varied somewhat.    Genuine unnamed stars are extremely rare so virtually all those you see will be erased or copies.The best way to spot fakes/renaming is to study the font, and understand the naming conventions.There are 3 styles of naming of 15/stars from 1920 to 1927 which cover the original first issues.After 1927 the fonts and conventions change.and the medals are either late issues or replacements. best w, Howard

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RNCVR
Posted (edited)

Original 1914-15 stars should have the recipient's name impressed(indented- pressed into) the flat reverse of the star, NOT engraved .

 

I will try to show you a couple examples frankish.

Edited by RNCVR

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RNCVR
Posted (edited)

Here are a couple RN (Royal Navy) named stars --  & an example of a name erased star......

 

Deeply impressed on three lines....Williamson JH.2.JPG

 

 

Taylor 010.JPG

 

 

 

Example of an erased star, note the deeply impressed periods are still visible on all three lines,

as are the horizontal file marks.name erased star.JPG

Edited by RNCVR

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Kimberley John Lindsay

Dear frankish,

You are wise to consult this Forum before purchasing any 1914 Star.

I attach reverses of the two in my collection, for what it is worth. Happily the stars (one with a sew-on clasp; the other a slider-type) P1150615.JPG.89e2e36dc00d2184c30eae2edc5577c9.JPG567237199_CaptBoddygroup.jpg.20e9d7b721cd212729a6f6e8d5ef0153.jpgP1150640.jpg.13abc5ef0c6221b3b265b530b152165e.jpg1038957807_Mathewsgroup14Starrev.jpg.c45e71fe98ebb5ae9081e48a9c3ee9f5.jpg1192627291_ErnestMathewsIAROlateSpr54FdCoyREBid240PoundsDNWJul2019.jpg.ff8dbbb57bcbb211639b4da4b8cba015.jpgare not only complete with the accompanying medals, but I researched Images of both NCOs who were subsequently commissioned into the Indian Army Reserve of Officers (IARO).

I would advise to be prepared to spend more, but collect not so-called singletons, but complete groups (with photo and paperwork). 

Having said that, one should not be dogmatic (one man's meat is another man's poison), especially concerning medal collecting.

Kindest regards,

Kim.

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bomberdier frankish

thank you all of you for your advice. i thought as much that the picture i displayed was a replica but by the look of it it looked too new to be an original as through time wear and tear and age obviously effect any medals surface giving it that patina. But other than checking the weight with a mons star or 1915 star being solid bronze and looking for imperfections if it was an erased medal it's hard to tell other than if it's a named medal if it's the genuine article or not.

 

north east medals have a guide for the second world war stars if they're reproductions which helps but not for ww1 stars, the british war and victory medal are easier to tell if they're genuine with the detail or the initials under the monarch's neck and the weight of the medal or along the side of the initials of the victory medal but i just wondered if anybody had any tips to look out for when buying a genuine star

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Lawryleslie

WW1 medals were issued with silk ribbons. If you see medals with more modern materials be a bit suspicious although of course ribbons may be a replacement at later date.

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RNCVR

True, however many genuinely named 1914-18 medals have replacement ribbons as the original silk ribbons are very hard to source these days.

 

The ribbon on a medal is no guarantee of that medal being genuine or a replacement\renamed medal.

 

Thanks,

Bryan

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