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David Ingleby

Medical diagnosis

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David Ingleby

Me again:

 

The attached gives the medical diagnosis for a soldier who died in No 3 Northern General Hospital in Sheffield in February 1919.

 

I read this as:

 

On demobilisation leave - pain in chest. Fire?? nails?? over both sides. Has attack of Dyspnaea - very cyanosed - Died 1.30am February 28th 1919.

 

Clearly I am barking up the wrong tree with Fire nails - can anyone help with deciphering what that actually says?

 

Many thanks

Screenshot 2020-06-30 at 16.07.39.png

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TEW

Not much help but it looks like 'Fine nâles' to me. Can't help with nâles and searches only produce some unusual results!

TEW

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MrSwan
Posted (edited)

I think it's "fine rales" over both sides. Rales is a lung sound caused by fluid congestion - if you have ever had an asthma attack you might have heard/felt it if exhaling deeply (well, as deep as you can!)

 

It's consistent with his other symptoms.. Had he ever been gassed?

Edited by MrSwan

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David Ingleby

That's great - thanks to you both.

 

There's nothing in his record to indicate he was gassed. He served in Gallipoli and Egypt (seemingly without troubling the medics) arriving in France in August 1916. He very quickly received a GSW to the head and received treatment in England at two London hospitals before being shipped back to France in June 1917.

 

He then went down with bronchitis (base hospitals this time), then more treatment for boils and scabies before mild influenza in Sep 1918. He was then shipped back for demob and was admitted to Shefield just before his death. There is a note later in his record to say that the cause of death was Acute Bronchitis.

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bmbab

I think it might be 'fine rales'. Fine Crackles (aka Rales) are high pitched sounds mostly heard in the lower lung bases. This can be abnormal findings on physical exam suggestive of things like congestive heart failure, pneumonia or atelectasis. There is even a youtube video that allows you to hear them.

 

Alan

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David Ingleby

Thank's Alan - yes, I have since found the youtube video - it sounds horrible. 

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PhilB

Rales is actually the French version with a circumflex visible above the A.

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
Posted (edited)

Rales or as the purists would have it, râles.

It's French.

(AS Phil just said...)

Edited by Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

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TEW

Or post #2. Wrong word entirely but with correct circumflex!

TEW

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MrSwan

I've found the circumflex ^ on my keypad so where's the "a circumflex" then? 

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
33 minutes ago, MrSwan said:

I've found the circumflex ^ on my keypad so where's the "a circumflex" then? 

If you use the Numeric keypad on the right side of the keyboard, and hold down ALT while you tap  in 0226 , you will get â.

 

ALT+ 0224  à

ALT+ 0225  á

ALT + 0232   è

ALT +0233  é

ALT +234    ê

Alt +0244  ô

 

Or you can go to Character Map in Windows Accessories and copy and paste from there

There's lots

 

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