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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Convalescent Company/Depot


Dawn W

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Hi,

 

I recently posted a snippet from my great grandfathers casualty record and experts on this forum kindly identified as abbreviation (Cons. Coy.) as being Convalescent Company.

 

Are these Convalescent Companies the same as Convalescent Depots?  I've found a likely Convalescent Depot where my great grandfather may have been treated at No. 2 Rest Camp, Bleville which appears to be linked to the Kings Royal Rifle Corps (my great grandfathers regiment).  I've based this assumption on the KRRC being linked to the 1 Infantry Base Depot at Havre and this Convalescent Depot is in the Havre region.  If I have identified the correct Convalescent Depot then how (or does anyone know) do I identify the correct number for this depot?

 

As yet I have found no reference to Convalescent Companies.

 

Thanks in advance,

Dawn

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Dawn a ‘depot’ (there were various types falling under that term) normally comprises a number of companies. So a convalescent depot would comprise of a number of convalescent companies. 
 

There were convalescent establishments both at home (Britain and Ireland) and in France and Flanders, although the most ‘relaxed’ ones were certainly at home and a part of the recovery and rehabilitation process that a soldier went through after wounding.  They were generally numbered and often located at a series of ‘rest camps’ dispersed around the rear areas.

 

It might be useful to do a search within the part of the forum that covers “medical services” matters: https://www.greatwarforum.org/forum/203-medical-services-home-and-abroad/

 

It’s best to use both terms ‘convalescent’ and ‘convalescence’ to get a variety of hits.  Also carry out the same search in an online search engine, as well as in the forum.

 

There is a superb film clip of typical activity at a convalescent depot in 1918 that gives a real impression of scale and extent here: 

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060000095

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Thank you Frogsmiles for the resources and information.  

 

He was admitted to the convalescence company on 1 Aug 1915 with epilepsy then transferred to 1CC station at Chocques in September.  Would I be right to assume that he would be admitted to the nearest convalescence camp regardless of his regiment? 

 

Thanks in advance,

Dawn

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10 hours ago, Dawn W said:

Thank you Frogsmiles for the resources and information.  

 

He was admitted to the convalescence company on 1 Aug 1915 with epilepsy then transferred to 1CC station at Chocques in September.  Would I be right to assume that he would be admitted to the nearest convalescence camp regardless of his regiment? 

 

Thanks in advance,

Dawn


Infantry Base Depots (IBDs) were regimentally aligned, but with rest camps and convalescent depots it was more to do with geography and what facilities were closest to his Division.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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12 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

There is a superb film clip of typical activity at a convalescent depot in 1918 that gives a real impression of scale and extent here: 

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060000095

FROGSMILE - thanks for posting this - very interesting - I think really worthy of your "superb"

If you are reading this and not yet seen the clip - then I too heartily recommend it.

Some aspects / activities seem quite familiar from much later times for fit men.

Sometimes they look rather like old men but at other times just like a bunch of kids [as many were of course earlier in the war] even if they were all young men.

Thank heavens for the underwear on the beach scenes! [probably because of the camera and expected audience (as I have elsewhere previously seen  a rather different state of undress :-/) - but I am sure you an/or AN OTHER will be able to cite an order / regulation or the like! ;-)]

Cheers.

:-) M

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