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Alecras234

ww1 difficulty

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Alecras234
Posted (edited)

Right hello guys and gals,  my name is Ash, im 42 from North Wales.   I'm disabled and i use a wheelchair.   i suffered head injury when i was 6 years old which is frustrating when im trying to understand or learn about things.    I'm interested in War especially ww1 but im having problems with the the books im reading.  The books i reading are,  History in an hour, World war one,  this book i do understand and i am enjoying,  it covers the brief outline, no detail.    The second book is called 1914 days of hope by Lyn McDonald,  im enjoying the story but it's very confusing so i get frustrated and put it down.  With the history in an hour book, it starts off with the assassination of Franz Ferdinand which i understand but it doesnt cover the events before the assassination whereas Lyn's book does cover the build up briefly but in words that lose me and i get frustrated because i don't understand.   I want to enjoy knowing and reading about the history of ww1 and understand battles.  Can you suggest how the learning process could be made easier for me please? 

 

Also, i like ww1 tanks, i have a book called Tank Hunter which i'm enjoying reading but I don't know which ww1 tanks i should read about, there's 3 british tanks that weren't even ready until after the war so.   I've read and learnt some things about the mk1 4 and 5, but which others should i learn about, the ones that fought in the war or the ones that were ready after ww1?

 

Thank you.

Edited by Alecras234

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David Filsell

Mr A

Thanks for your posting. It's not an easy question. I think probably that each and every one of us interested in the Great War, with or without disability, has had the same problem - I know I did when I started and stlll do now from time to time. Key is never try to read a book, fail and then feel guilty about not finishing it. Move on, try something else. Be patient with yourself - getting impatient with authors is not a bad thing. Keep simple keynotes. Check difficult words, terminology and definitions on the internet as you go. You can also use Google to check- out most things. The key is patience with your self and the author. Finally, if you are not enjoying the task you have set your self you can move on.

My view though is  keep going at your own pace, read what you enjoy, enjoy leaving those which you don't. Best of luck

David

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Alecras234

Do i need to learn what happened in the Balkans before Bosnia was annexed in 1908, can't i just learn my ww1 journey from the assassination of Franz Ferdinand onwards?

 

Ash

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depaor01
7 minutes ago, Alecras234 said:

can't i just learn my ww1 journey from the assassination of Franz Ferdinand onwards?

 

Ash

Yes you can absolutely. There's no right or wrong way. Pick and choose to suit yourself.

A great overview is the BBC Great War DVD. The series was filmed in 1965 and has many veterans being interviewed  Watch them all. Take notes. Anything that stands out for you, concentrate on reading about that.

 

If it's any comfort,  I find descriptions of battle movements VERY difficult to follow!

 

Dave

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Michelle Young
16 minutes ago, Alecras234 said:

Do i need to learn what happened in the Balkans before Bosnia was annexed in 1908, can't i just learn my ww1 journey from the assassination of Franz Ferdinand onwards?

 

Ash

I've never read about what happened in the Balkans in 1908, and I've been reading about the Great War for 35 years! 

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sassenach

As has been said above, there are no rules. Sooner or later you will probably come across something that really grabs your interest, and you may want to specialise in that, at least for a while, rather than try to learn everything, which is pretty much impossible.

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johnboy

Make sure you read things thatinterest you. Flick through the various forum headings and see if a particular topic hits you. The Great War has mant topics where knowing the history of it is not needed.

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

Hi Ash,

I'm originally from North Wales too, but live down south now.

Read to enjoy, you don't have to commit everything you read to memory.

When I decide to read something, I often find that an interesting fact catches my eye, and I decide to follow that fact and follow that up instead.

And while following that fact, another one comes along and interests me.

Yo don't have to start a book at the begining and slog painfully through it, you can dip into books for as long or as short as you want.

The secret to learning is to enjoy it and be thrilled by it.

That leaves you wanting more.

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Alecras234

Hi guys thanks for your replies with suggestions.   I'm currently on the amazon website and im reading the samples of kindle books on ww1,  i've been reading the sample of a book called, A war that ended peace by Margaret McMillan.   The first chapter i found interesting,  it's about the Paris Exposition of 1900 where various countries display their various cultures from the past.   The second chapter is about Queen victoria's diamond jubilee and goes into the Navel demonstration at spit-head.  The chapters are so long though,  if i could read parts of a chapter rather than spend days reading the whole chapter would be good.  What do you think, should thee whole chapters be read or is it ok i read part of the chapters?

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Michelle Young

I would recommend reading a few memoirs. I can’t manage battalion histories or the official histories. You will still learn about the war.

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Alecras234

Do you mean Autobiographies,  which do you recommend?  

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David Filsell

Since you recently started your entry into WW1, my view would be to read general accounts the war first to build a picture if events, then when your have grounded your knowledge move into biogs.

regards

David

 

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Alecras234
RegHannay

Good evening Ash. Like yourself I find to much information tends to give me overload and I have to stop before I lose interest. I came across the Great War Forum while trying to research my grandfathers war diaries. He was a Medical officer RAMC WW1. 

I am not very good with researching(no patience) but the many members of this forum are. What I tend to do is use the browser and online users, find a thread that looks interesting and read. If it is not for me find another until one catches my interest. I have learnt so much from this Forum. You will find that most members will help you understand if you ask.

I see you have an interest in tanks, have you tried the Tank Museum, Bovington Camp, Dorset.? At  the moment it is closed because of Covid but you can still contact online. The staff there are so helpful and really know their stuff. When this lock-down eases you must visit. 

Good luck and don't let frustration beat you

Dave

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johnboy

Since my stroke and low attention span I find books with lots of pics or diagrams easy to digest, A picture that interestsme often opens other doors.

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Alecras234

I'm getting nowhere here.   I found this easy to read book and has short chapters that cover battles.  I learned about FF assassinatiion and the Schlieffen plan by reading this book.  Should i read this to know about various things that happened but then read a memoir aswel?  Here's the book  https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-War-One-History-Hour-ebook/dp/B007E3ESWC/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=history+in+hour+ww1&qid=1592082910&sr=8-1

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Michelle Young

Hi Ash, we’ve covered this in a couple of other threads you have started. You have had plenty of recommendations about books to read and advice. Don’t get too hung up about chronology, pick something that interests you and try to read about that. 
Michelle  

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

I'd leave any memoirs for now, until you have a good grounding in the basics.  The point of reading a memoir is to get an insight into one person's take on events. Until you've studied the subject, how do you know whose insight you want to read in depth.?

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mancpal

Would YouTube be a useful tool ? There are countless WW1 videos and though I haven't looked for one I feel sure there will be some which cover the war in general rather than a 30 minute video about 1 small aspect that is invaluable only to a few. Regarding tanks, there has been at least 1 thread about 2 brothers building a replica British tank (Mk 4 I think). YouTube has a couple of videos of the finished article which you should find under 'Poelcapelle tank' or similar.

Do you know if any of your family served in the War? I began my interest by looking for my grandfather,  as I found bits out that puzzled me on the way I looked up the topic as best I could pre internet. The upshot of this method is while learning about your relative you will acquire a wealth of knowledge regarding the war in general.

If you cant find a relative to search then how about somebody from a local memorial though start with one where at least you have his regiment or far better his service number and better still an unusual name. I suggest this method as there will be members on here itching to help and explain .

As above the best method is patience with yourself and the subject and don't be afraid to ask questions on here, this forum is possibly the best WW1 encyclopaedia available. 

I also would advise browsing the long long trail linked above for a wealth of knowledge about most aspects of the subject.

 

Simon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alecras234

Hi thanks for all your responses, im sorry but i want to be knowledgeable about the Great War and tanks and is frustrating.  I was looking at my ww1 book today and i typed a few notes, like questions and answers.    What do you think?

 

what battle was chlorine gas first used as a weapon?   Second battle of Ypres

when was the second battle of Ypres?  22 April 1915

who was the pioneer of gas warfare?  Fritz Haber

what gas did Fritz Haber develop?  Phosgene

Where was Phosgene first used?  Eastern Front

when did the Germans introduce mustard gas?  1917

When was the flamethrower first used?  February 1915

Who was the flamethrower used against?  French soldiers

When was the Battle of Loos?  September 1915

Who was Commander in-chief of the British army in ww1?  Sir John French

Who replaced Sir John French?  Douglas Haig

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Michelle Young

When lockdown is over you may want to attend WFA meetings. WFA North Wales meet in Llandudno. The hall was modern and if I recall had wheelchair access. You don’t have to be a member of the WFA to attend. 
Michelle 

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Steviebullsatatter

Hi alecras

Not had time to read all the messages but wanted to say I have a bbc compilation on vhs cassettes and consequently this has been recorded onto dvds.

You are most welcome to have the dvds . I can post them to you f.o.c.

It's a much easier way of understanding the  great war. 

Regards Steve 

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Steviebullsatatter

And ... my best friends wifes gt grandfather was killed in  a ww1 tank during the battle of cambrai..

There is so much online regarding ww1 tanks and their museums. 

Steve 

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Alecras234

Hi guys, all i need is guidance.   Do those questions and answers sound ok?

 

what battle was chlorine gas first used as a weapon?   Second battle of Ypres

when was the second battle of Ypres?  22 April 1915

who was the pioneer of gas warfare?  Fritz Haber

what gas did Fritz Haber develop?  Phosgene

Where was Phosgene first used?  Eastern Front

when did the Germans introduce mustard gas?  1917

When was the flamethrower first used?  February 1915

Who was the flamethrower used against?  French soldiers

When was the Battle of Loos?  September 1915

why did the British gas attack fail? The gas blew back to British lines

Who was Commander in-chief of the British army in ww1?  Sir John French

Who replaced Sir John French?  Douglas Haig

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Alecras234

Hi guys how are we all doing?  Right,  i've started reading a book called Nobody of any importance, which is about the life of a ww1 soldier.   In what other way can i gain my lack of knowledge of WW1 please?

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