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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Silver War Badge - Lincolnshire Regt.


KizmeRD

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Sorry but need help in completing my GF’s Great War service history. He enlisted in the 1st Bn. Lincs sometime towards the end of 1914 (Service No. 9481) and when the war started his Bn. was serving in Portsmouth. He was sent to France as part of the BEF (disembarkation date 13 Aug 14) attached to the 9th Brigade, 3rd Division and fought in the Battle of Mons, the rearguard action at Solesmes, Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne, La Bassee, Messines and the First Battle of Ypres.

 

He was listed in a Times list of wounded dated 27 February 1915 and after recovering back in Blighty he was (I think) posted to the 8th (Service) Battalion, as a battle hardened veteran serving in a K3 unit.
 
He appears again in a Times list of wounded dated 20 November 1915, this time because of what I understand were gunshot wounds received during the Battle of Loos.

 

I can't find any record of his war service from 1916 onwards (was he once again posted to a different battalion and sent back to the front, or perhaps this time he was permanently discharged due to wounds received?)

 

His name is Private William Henry Bloy, SWB no. A/1167 (or JA/1167) - I’d simply like to establish his actual date of discharge.
 

Any help greatly appreciated (as I’m more familiar with naval matters).

 

Regards, Michael

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According to his SWB he enlisted on 13th November 1912 and was discharged due to wounds on 23rd May 1919. His SWB number is B143859

Edited by ajsmith
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Thanks for the information on his discharge date.
Poor ******, it seems that he was in from the first day of the war through to the bitter end, with very little respite.

I now need to double check which battalion he served in from 1916 onwards.

Michael

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He is named in the casualty list in The Scotsman newspaper, published November 16th 1914 as wounded.

Courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive 

 

Edit.....he is shown as wounded in The Sheffield Daily Telegraph a month earlier, Oct 16th.1914.

 

Edit2....the telegraph article states the wounded were

" reported by the DAG 3rd echelon under date September 30th."

 

 

Screenshot_20200611-103046.jpg

Edited by sadbrewer
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22 hours ago, KizmeRD said:

 

He appears again in a Times list of wounded dated 20 November 1915, this time because of what I understand were gunshot wounds received during the Battle of Loos.

 

Regards, Michael

Michael

I could not find him in the Times OCL 20/11/1915. There is a large list of 8 Bn Missing on 02/11/1915 (my gf is on it) and on the same day in the Lincolnshire Echo.

Brian

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Thanks sadbrewer, he always said that he was wounded three times during the Great War, so this was the first of those three occasions. As a kid I vividly remember putting my fist in a hole the size of a tennis ball in his shoulder and he also had several other large scars on his body which were all from gunshot wounds - he’s lucky to have avoided shell injuries!

He also recalled to me the long, long foot slog down from Mons to the Marne and then all the way back up again into Belgium. Judging by the date (Sept.30) I presume that he must have picked up his first injury at Messines. 
Thanks also to ajsmith.

Michael

Edited by KizmeRD
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You seem to have have the first and third woundings. I think the second was that reported 27/2/15 List from Base dated 8/1/15

 

Charlie

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Being discharged for wounds suggests eligibility for a Pension. No card digitised yet but it may well be in the next year ?

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Thanks again Charlie, as he was a regular soldier with time still to serve, I presume that he was discharged due to his injuries so maybe he also received an Army pension.

Despite his war wounds he lived a long and happy life, and on returning to civvy street he married the girl he first met in Portsmouth before hostilities commenced and took him to France. They had five children together and lots of grandchildren. He became a tram driver on the Portsmouth Tramways and he was a proud member of the Old Contemptible's Association.

Michael

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18 hours ago, KizmeRD said:

Thanks again Charlie, as he was a regular soldier with time still to serve, I presume that he was discharged due to his injuries so maybe he also received an Army pension.

Despite his war wounds he lived a long and happy life, and on returning to civvy street he married the girl he first met in Portsmouth before hostilities commenced and took him to France. They had five children together and lots of grandchildren. He became a tram driver on the Portsmouth Tramways and he was a proud member of the Old Contemptible's Association.

Michael

 Bearing the above in mind, you may find this interesting...From The Evening News, February 9th, 1927.

Courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive 

 

 

Screenshot_20200613-101539.jpg

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Brilliant, thank you again.

Michael

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1 hour ago, KizmeRD said:

Brilliant, thank you again.

Michael

Just to let you know there are a few Bloy related articles in The British Newspaper Archive....a couple of family weddings and a court case in the 50's.

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