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Remembered Today:

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stevem49
Posted (edited)

I have chaps medical records (9th Sherwood Foresters and then RDC) 

I have uploaded two images to give an idea and all except h.g.w has been deciphered.  Anyone any ideas on it and even if it is h g w.  I presume it has something to do with the fits he was experiencing.

 

Many thanks for looking

 

 

Steve M

MIUK1914A_118780-00015.jpg

MIUK1914A_118780-00016.jpg

Edited by stevem49

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DavidOwen

I think it is actually " n.a.d." = nothing abnormal detected. Meaning they didn't no what the cause was.

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stevem49

I thought the h might have been an n !  I can see it now that you have told me :) 

 

Many thanks David, I will let his relatives know. 

Best Regards

 

Steve

 

 

 

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

Yes, NAD.

One of the staple  med. abbs. 

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stevem49

Thank you. 

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
On 20/05/2020 at 16:09, DavidOwen said:

" n.a.d." = nothing abnormal detected.

Yes, or discovered.

On 20/05/2020 at 16:09, DavidOwen said:

Meaning they didn't no what the cause was.

Well, not necessarily. Yes, it could mean that there was no diagnosis made.

But perhaps it means they could be confident that there was no cause for a condition.

It could mean that important causes of a condition were not found and that the condition possibly was primary or idiopathic, rather than secondary.

Having some normal examination findings and some tests come back negative can exclude some conditions from a differential diagnosis.

In this instance, though it could be read as though they didn't know what the cause of the fits were, whilst at the same time remembering that fits are usually 'idiopathic' anyway, meaning 'of no known other cause'.

It is therefore reassuring to know that after a clinical examination that nothing abnormal was discovered, meaning that a secondary cause such as a tumour, stroke, brain injury, meningitis, or whatever had actually been excluded

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TEW

I always had it down as no appreciable disease.

TEW

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TEW

Found the RAMC crib sheet I took it from.

TEWfa.jpg.d8d9a49aba43a7a5e3936b931dbee09d.jpg

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Dai Bach y Sowldiwr
Posted (edited)

That's very interesting TEW.

Its meaning (like many other terms) has obviously changed over the decades.

That's the trouble with abbs.

Edited by Dai Bach y Sowldiwr

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stevem49

Thank you gents. I really must gen up on my medical terms :) 

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stevem49

I have just found out that his father Walter Turton, RMLI, was wounded on Gallipoli and died in Gib on 30/5/1915. I wonder what went through the young mans mind as he sailed for Gallipoli knowing his father had not survived.

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Robert Dunlop
On 21/05/2020 at 21:47, Dai Bach y Sowldiwr said:

...meaning (like many other terms) has obviously changed over the decades.

That's the trouble with abbs.

Now known as 'six packs' ;)

 

NAD was used as short-hand for 'no abnormality detected' when I trained but was often translated as 'not actually done' because the abbreviation did not actually tell a colleague what had been done to rule out an abnormality.

 

Robert

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