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WWI Army Punishment.


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Hi. Thanks for letting me join.

This is my first post and I am seeking help rather than contributing.

I am researching the grandfather of a friend. He was not exactly a model soldier and  I am trying to find out what his punishments were, he had a few.

He enlisted and was placed in the reserves. While at summer camp he received four and a half days detention.

.

Six weeks after mobilisation he received 3 days confined to barracks and 2 days loss of pay.

Then in a nine week period at Wyke Regis he received

4 days CC.

7 days CC.

5 days CC.

7 days CC.

7 days detention.

21 days detention

Admonished.

7 days detention.

In August 1918 he was sent to France for 7 weeks and was awarded 10 days Field Punishment No 1.

.

Help needed on what they all are and mean please.

Thank you and STAY SAFE!

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CC =  Confined to camp, Wyke Regis being a camp on the outskirts of Weymouth.

 

Field Punishment No.1  Here

 

Alan.

Edited by Alan24
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Detention = confinement in a military prison or similar.

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FROGSMILE

Admonished = Verbal reprimand and stern warning.  Usually given when the default concerned doesn't quite cross the threshold to award a substantive punishment.  However, it does go on record on the 'company conduct sheet' (which is periodically destroyed), leaving only the 'battalion conduct sheet' as a permanent record.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Many thanks gentlemen.

The soldier in question returned home in October 1918 and was discharged in April 1920, 

He seems to have spent the intervening 18 months in a hospital before being discharged with 'Exhaustion Psychosis'.

.

Before I began the research the family told me he came home suffering from 'shell shock', it seems that he may have had an existing problem.

Again many thanks and stay safe.

I will now go and have a wander around other parts of the site.

I did look up Wyke Regis camp on Wiki, it said it was built in 1928 which threw me.

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23 minutes ago, Darloboy said:

I did look up Wyke Regis camp on Wiki, it said it was built in 1928 which threw me.

 

The 3rd Battalion Dorsetshire Regt were there in 1917 as part of the Portland Garrison.

The site is still green fields (at the moment) a road named 'Camp Road' run through it...bit of a clue there.

 

The location is within the red ring below.

 

Note! The red ring is not intended to mark the boundary of the camp, just the approx location.

 

Regards

 

Alan.

wyke.JPG

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Many thanks, he was in the 3rd at Wyke Regis May-August 1918.

He went to France on the 27/8/18, do you know if  the Bttn went or did they just get rid of him?

Edited by Darloboy
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10 minutes ago, Darloboy said:

Many thanks, he was in the 3rd at Wyke Regis May-August 1918.

He went to France on the 27/8/18, do you know if  the Bttn went or did they just get rid of him?

They wouldn't of got rid of him. There was a desperate need for men by that time in the war. He would have been transferred to join another battalion already overseas.

3rd Dorsets would have remained a training battalion at Wyke Regis.

His medal roll may show which battalion he first served with in the war zone.

If you give his name I'll see if anything shows which battalions he served with overseas.

 

Alan.

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I wonder if he was a conscientous objector.  A detachment of the Non Combatant Corps passed through the camp at Wyke Regis.

 

You would need to do more research, a name often helps

 

Ken

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He enlisted on the 10.12.1915.

Mobilised 21.3.1917.

William Stanley 40680 Originally Devons.  May have been in some military unit before.

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5 minutes ago, Darloboy said:

He enlisted on the 10.12.1915.

Mobilised 21.3.1917.

William Stanley 40680 Originally Devons.  May have been in some military unit before.

The medal roll shows he was posted to the 1st Battalion Dorsets overseas. 

 

Regards

 

Alan.

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It looks as if he hadn't even arrived at his battalion in France when he committed the offence for which he received the FP No 1 as the offence was at Rouen on 31 Aug 1918, his date of arrival is given as 27 Aug.  His battalion was in the line miles away near Belloy.  The witnesses were two RAMC officers, the charge feigning disease, deafness which he didn't have. 

 

Max

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His service is quite nicely summed up here.

 

13th Devon (Works) Battalion...which became

3rd Labour Corps in April 1917

3rd Dorsets

1st Dorsets

 

He enlisted under the terms of the Group Scheme and Between 10.12.15 and 21.03.17 would have carried on with his civilian job at home.

 

He clearly didn't like being in the army despite being a volunteer!

 

Regards

 

Alan

 

 

dor.JPG

Edited by Alan24
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Many thanks guys!

On the front page of his service records it looks as though he answers 'yes' to being in the army previously and it looks like Gloucestershire ??

.

I did tell the family that he may not be the dashing hero who missed out on a VC.

Hope they don't think I was joking. 

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His previous service was in the Gloucestershire Militia (the last word is very faint).

 

Max

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Thank you, I could see some 'tall' letters I thought it might be volunteers.

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Keith Woodland
12 hours ago, Alan24 said:

CC =  Confined to camp, Wyke Regis being a camp on the outskirts of Weymouth.

 

Field Punishment No.1  Here

 

Alan.

I did a week at Wyke Regis camp in 1965 whilst training on Chesil Beach with the RE prior to going to Borneo. As I recall it was an old camp with wooden accommodation so it may well have been the same camp.

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BullerTurner
On 18/04/2020 at 14:44, Darloboy said:

The soldier in question returned home in October 1918 and was discharged in April 1920, 

He seems to have spent the intervening 18 months in a hospital before being discharged with 'Exhaustion Psychosis'.

 

I would imagine his adjutant and RSM also suffered from exhaustion psychoses...

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1 hour ago, BullerTurner said:

I would imagine his adjutant and RSM also suffered from exhaustion psychoses...

The friend I am doing the research for remembers, as a young child, seeing him as an old man and being told that he never fully recovered from 'his time in the trenches'.

Trench time would seem to be very limited, if any.

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BullerTurner
On 20/04/2020 at 16:29, Darloboy said:

The friend I am doing the research for remembers, as a young child, seeing him as an old man and being told that he never fully recovered from 'his time in the trenches'.

Trench time would seem to be very limited, if any.

There is no set time in the trenches to induce psychosis or PTSD.  One man might last four years, another four days.  Another might seem entirely asymptomatic until a trigger - a memory, a scent, a sound - came into play.

 

i commend Lord Moran’s The Anatomy of Courage to you?

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