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Remembered Today:

What unit was A.T.S.C.?


Waggoner

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A horse transport driver (T prefix) has the unit on his MIC shown as “A.T.S.C. A.S.C.”. He went to France on 15 August 1914. Can anyone decipher what A.T.S.C. stands for? One suggestion is Army Troops Supply Column but would there have been army level troops in France in August 1914? Looking forward to your thoughts!
 

All the best,

 

Gary

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10 hours ago, Waggoner said:

One suggestion is Army Troops Supply Column but would there have been army level troops in France in August 1914?

See the list on p.118 of Beadon's Vol.ii

Listed under Mechanical Transport, but nevertheless Army Troops Supply Column

 

edit to add: I'm pretty sure that Gary has a copy of Beadon's work but for those without, the list is a note following 

"With the original Expeditionary Force of six divisions and a cavalry division, army lines of communication troops, were mobilisied thirty-four horse and nineteen mechanical transport companies; three remount depots and sixty supply units of various sizes, figures, amounting to some 15,000 all ranks, which give some measure of the participation in the regular field army. The initial movements, which effected a concentraion of four divisions and the cavalry division in the neighbourhood of Le Cateau on the left flank of the Fifth French Army was completed by the end of the 20th August......"

Edited by michaeldr
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I believe Army Troop Supply Columns were attached at Corps level. I can check this later when I get home or anyone with Mike Young's book can check this.

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Can someone please clarify what publications the quotes regarding ‘Beadon’s’ and ‘Mike Young’ are referring to?

Edited by FROGSMILE
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Looking at Young's book, he has the same list as given in Beadon's, however he adds that the unit in question was 55 MT Company

see p.51

 

the books are:

1] The Royal Army Service Corps - A History of Transport & Supply in the British Army - in two volumes

by Col R H Beadon CBE, psc, pub 1930

2] Army Service Corps 1902-1918 by Lt Col M H G Young, pub 2000

Edited by michaeldr
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3 minutes ago, michaeldr said:

Looking at Young's book, he has the same list as given in Beadon's, however he adds that the unit in question was 55 MT Company

In Young's Annex Q he has for this company "GHQ Troops Supply Company (MT)" and the ref WO 95 144

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2 hours ago, Gardenerbill said:

I believe Army Troop Supply Columns were attached at Corps level. I can check this later when I get home or anyone with Mike Young's book can check this.

Army Troops Supply Columns were attached at GHQ and, later, Army level. Corps had Corps Troops Supply Columns.

 

Ron

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48 minutes ago, michaeldr said:

Looking at Young's book, he has the same list as given in Beadon's, however he adds that the unit in question was 55 MT Company

see p.51

 

the books are:

1] The Royal Army Service Corps - A History of Transport & Supply in the British Army - in two volumes

by Col R H Beadon CBE, psc, pub 1930

2] Army Service Corps 1902-1918 by Lt Col M H G Young, pub 2000

 

Thank you Michael, and Bill and Ron.  It's good to know where the information can be found.

 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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2 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:

 It's good to know where the information can be found

Sincere appologies and note, no offence intended.

This was probably the result of my lazy thinking, forgetting how widely some posts can be read

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9 minutes ago, michaeldr said:

Sincere appologies and note, no offence intended.

This was probably the result of my lazy thinking, forgetting how widely some posts can be read

 

Not at all, I'm unaware of some of the more recent publications (in 2000s) and am always keen to learn of any good ones, and had not heard of Beadon before.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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1 minute ago, michaeldr said:

It used to be available in 2 volumes paper-back as a reprint from N & M

 

Thank you.  I'll see what abe books have to offer.

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My thanks to all of you for your feedback!

 

All the best,

 

Gary

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1 hour ago, michaeldr said:

It used to be available in 2 volumes paper-back as a reprint from N & M


I just got a shock from the cost of the Lt Col Young book, even the first edition!

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3 hours ago, michaeldr said:

It used to be available in 2 volumes paper-back as a reprint from N & M

Volume 2 of the Beadon book is available as a free download from archive.org. The link says Vol 1, but it's Vol 2. I haven't been able to track down free access Vol 1 yet.

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31 minutes ago, KernelPanic said:

Volume 2 of the Beadon book is available as a free download from archive.org. The link says Vol 1, but it's Vol 2. I haven't been able to track down free access Vol 1 yet.


 Thank you, that’s useful to know. 

6 minutes ago, Gardenerbill said:

Generally I find the Mike Young book more useful.


Yes, I found all the reviews to be good, but small print runs are causing the price to be exorbitant.

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I think that Beadon may in fact have more detail, but having been written and published in 1930, it's put across in a very traditional narrative way. Young made extensive use of Beadon (e.g. the list referred to earlier) but where Young scores hands down is in his many Annexes with their wealth of information for the modern day researcher

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4 hours ago, Gardenerbill said:

I was lucky enough to got my copy a couple of years ago when the last print run came out, I don't recall the price being excessive at the time.


Grateful you let me know if you see a reasonably priced copy Bill.

3 hours ago, michaeldr said:

I think that Beadon may in fact have more detail, but having been written and published in 1930, it's put across in a very traditional narrative way. Young made extensive use of Beadon (e.g. the list referred to earlier) but where Young scores hands down is in his many Annexes with their wealth of information for the modern day researcher


As a trained staff officer in the modern era he would have been well trained in the use of annexes and tables so I can well imagine that his work is more user friendly.

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