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Viliam

Repairing Remington P14 scabbard

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Viliam

Hi everyone. I have bought this Remington P14 r ecently in a good condition however, the scabbard

is damaged. Any advice on how to repair this will be much appreciated.

83559950_879267999186104_544443493393629184_n.jpg

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GRANVILLE

I'll stick my neck out and say that you won't be able to adequately repair it and all things considered you would be best looking for another.

 

David

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OLD ROBIN HOOD

Greetings from Sherwood Forest

I have several scabbards that have broken in this way. I have to agree with Granville that a repair is very difficult .

I have used super glue but the result is purely cosmetic and has no strength.

Scabbards do still turn up so a replacement would be the best plan in my opinion.

 

                                                    Old Robin Hood 

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GWF1967

I’d agree with the advice given, keep it for spare parts and keep eyes open for a replacement - trouble is, you may find a full one or two you like!

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Dave66

I have a couple of these in the spares box that await awaiting repair!

unless it’s a matching numbers scabbard it’s really not worth it but I’d agree with gwf....the contents have got to be really shot to value the scabbard alone.

 

Dave.

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JMB1943

I did a repair on one of my scabbards that, like yours, was broken very close to the locket into two separate pieces.

The scabbard was a very early one; it was of mid-brown, shiny leather, both locket and chape (the top & bottom metal fittings, respectively) were of brightly polished metal.

It was worth repairing because it came with the hook quillon Patt. 1907 bayonet that I had bought.

The comment above about lacking strength is true, but I solved it as follows.

I opened up a flat tin of sardines that had a pull tab on a section of thin metal about 2 inch wide by 4 inch long; this is iron that has been tinned.

Then ate the sardines with about 3 slices of  toast.

Cleaned the metal thoroughly, cut a suitable length and folded into an oval, applied glue to the surface, then slid the two pieces of the scabbard onto the metal.

The metal tried to unroll and so expanded to make a good seal with the scabbard parts.

 

Regards,

JMB

 

 

Edited by JMB1943
typo

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Dave66
8 minutes ago, JMB1943 said:

Then ate the sardines with about 3 slices of  toast

The best bit😀👍

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OLD ROBIN HOOD

Greetings from a damp Sherwood Forest

 

I think that JMB has a good idea there . It could work , I will give it a try on one of my broken scabbards , there is nothing to loose.

I have a tin of sardines which I will eat with avocado and salad., nice.

 

                                                                            Robin

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Waggoner

I suspect that a tin of smoked oysters would work equally well. :-) The main thing is to reinforce the repair from the inside.

 

All the best,

 

Gary

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JMB1943
15 hours ago, Dave66 said:

The best bit😀👍

Dave,

 

I thought that you would appreciate that.

 

Regards,

JMB

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Dave1418

Hi

they are rather difficult to repair when broken through as yours is and you could use the techniques outlined previously but you’re going to see the join. Alternatively you could strip it fully and keep the staples, Cut through the stitching and use the leather as a template, Mike it slightly wider as once stitched together it seam will have to be rounded over and skived down to the correct depth. Place the metalwork back in place with some adhesive and push the staples in, once the bayonet goes back in it will bend the staples over at the same time

Dave

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GRANVILLE
16 hours ago, JMB1943 said:

I did a repair on one of my scabbards that, like yours, was broken very close to the locket into two separate lockets.

The scabbard was a very early one; it was of mid-brown, shiny leather, both locket and chape (the top & bottom metal fittings, respectively) were of brightly polished metal.

It was worth repairing because it came with the hook quillon Patt. 1907 bayonet that I had bought.

The comment above about lacking strength is true, but I solved it as follows.

I opened up a flat tin of sardines that had a pull tab on a section of thin metal about 2 inch wide by 4 inch long; this is iron that has been tinned.

Then ate the sardines with about 3 slices of  toast.

Cleaned the metal thoroughly, cut a suitable length and folded into an oval, applied glue to the surface, then slid the two pieces of the scabbard onto the metal.

The metal tried to unroll and so expanded to make a good seal with the scabbard parts.

 

Regards,

JMB

 

 

I nearly put this suggestion forward in my original reply to the query, as it was the only possible repair I could think which might just stand a chance of success. However, I was unsure if a bayonet could still be inserted and withdrawn without fouling on the metal 'splint'. The idea is sound and with suitable glue (I was thinking Araldite at the time), it should in theory make a good rigid repair, but the bayonet remains my uncertainty.

 

David

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depaor01
21 minutes ago, GRANVILLE said:

I nearly put this suggestion forward in my original reply to the query, as it was the only possible repair I could think which might just stand a chance of success. However, I was unsure if a bayonet could still be inserted and withdrawn without fouling on the metal 'splint'. The idea is sound and with suitable glue (I was thinking Araldite at the time), it should in theory make a good rigid repair, but the bayonet remains my uncertainty.

 

David

 I think a no-glue dry run would be advisable to check for snagging. Great idea though, and I love the intricate detail about the dispatch of the sardines :lol:

Dave

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JMB1943
40 minutes ago, GRANVILLE said:

I nearly put this suggestion forward in my original reply to the query, as it was the only possible repair I could think which might just stand a chance of success. However, I was unsure if a bayonet could still be inserted and withdrawn without fouling on the metal 'splint'. The idea is sound and with suitable glue (I was thinking Araldite at the time), it should in theory make a good rigid repair, but the bayonet remains my uncertainty.

 

David

 

David,

 

I did actually also put a thin cardboard insert inside the metal splint to protect the v.g.c. blade of the HQ bayonet.

It was cut from a toilet roll, I think.

So far, all is good.

 

Regards,

JMB

 

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GRANVILLE
3 hours ago, JMB1943 said:

 

David,

 

I did actually also put a thin cardboard insert inside the metal splint to protect the v.g.c. blade of the HQ bayonet.

It was cut from a toilet roll, I think.

So far, all is good.

 

Regards,

JMB

 

Sound idea.


David

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Joolz

I've done this kind of repair on both sword and bayonet scabbards, using a thin piece of leather rolled in a tube and glued in place inside the scabbard with leather glue. Glue one end in place first, let it dry, then join the two halves of the scabbard together, using a thin piece of something rigid down the inside to push the leather down on the inside (I use a shaped piece of flat wood, this is the fiddly bit!). The join should be pretty strong, the only thing you have to worry about is being careful when you re-insert the blade not to let the point catch the leather patch. There is plenty of wiggle-room inside the scabbard for your internal patch not to interfere with the blade along its length.

 

Good luck,

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Paddy 60th
On 02/02/2020 at 00:02, Dave66 said:

The best bit😀👍

Three slices of toast - a bit excessive. I think two would be better - don’t have to spread the sardines out so much !

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