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mickey selcon

neurasthenia

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mickey selcon

Hi

 

I wonder if anyone can help me. I have found a record for an officer in the ASC , who in March 1915 was admitted to Millbank Hospital in London suffering from Neurasthenia. He was at the hospital until the 17th of March before being sent on to 10 Palace Green to convalesce, before going back on active service on both the Western Front and the Italian Front. However, on his admission record they noted that he'd had 15 days pay stopped while at the hospital, the stoppage being recorded under the column marked : "Stoppage of Whole Pay under King's Regulations".

 

Can anyone tell me why his pay would been stopped while in hospital? Could it have been because he was suffering from neurasthenia or was this something that happened in all cases?

 

Thanks

 

Mike

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seaJane

King's Regulations 1913 does include "Hospital Stoppages" - so I don't think it was specific to neurasthenia, but I'm a bit baffled why it should be whole pay.

 

Is it possible to work it out from the pages here? (sorry, I don't have time to read through) - https://archive.org/details/b2146652x/page/26/mode/2up/search/hospital+stoppages (should settle on p.26-27; para. 73 and following, on p.27 ff., are the ones you need.

 

sJ

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mickey selcon

Thanks SJ

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charlie962
On 30/01/2020 at 17:24, mickey selcon said:

March 1915

Very early days for understanding shell-shock. In those early days officers were treated more kindly than ORs;

 

Would be interested to know what you come up with, Mike

 

Charlie

Edited by charlie962

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mickey selcon

Hi Charlie

 

Unfortunately not much more, other that 10 Palace Green would have been quite 'groundbreaking' at the time and obviously what they did worked as similar hospitals were opened as the War progressed. It's a shame that ORs didn't get the same help, officers with neurasthenia as you said generally being treated with kindness and rest, while ORs were classed as having  'hystreia' and were given a much harder regime of treatment.

 

I will let you know if I find any more.

 

best regards

Mike

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museumtom

I have often seen this associated with Syphilis, Shell Shock, Heart failure, General Paralysis of the insane, etc Here are some examples.

Discharged on 27/08/1916 no longer phyically fit for war service-neurasthenia. ’ Origin May 17th, 1916, Egypt. Was admitted to hospital in a dull depressed condition and complaining of headache and chronic rheumatic pains, was confused, forgetful, depressed and unable to give a satisfactory history of himself. He has now made a good recovery and has been given parole, which he has transgressed, he tells how in Egypt he esposed himself to the sun, and that along with his old head injury made him feel dull. he has good insight into his condition. Not the result of but aggravated by active service, stress of campaign.’

 Discharged at Hemel Hempsteadon 29/06/1916, no longer physically fit for war service-Neurasthenia.-’Originated 20/06/1915 at Armentieres. States that while on active service began to have attacks of dizziness and unsteadiness. Some decayed stumps in both upper and lower jaw. Nothing abnormal found in heart, lungs or abdomen. Low tension pulse. Knee jerks exaggerated. Result of active service. Strain on active service.’

Died after discharge. A single man. Discharged on 21/07/1915-no longer physically fit for war service-neurasthenia functional aphonia. Originated 18/02/1916 in France.  Occupation on enlistment-blacksmith.

Discharged 19/09/1916, no longer fit for war service-neurasthenia. ’Originated February 1916, in Servia. While retreating through Servia, in consequence of strain, his nervous system broke down and he was admitted to Salonika Hospital. he is fragile, stooped, tremulous with exaggerated reflexes. he has been in Hospital and Convalescent Home since 25/07/1916 and shows no improvement. The result of active service, nerve strain and exposure in Servia.’  Occupation on enlistment-labourer. Formerly served with the Royal Irish Regiment.

Died at St Anne de Belvue Hospital, Montreal, from Neurasthenia Heart failure. A note in his records-"He nurses his imaginary heart and lung trouble and says he wants to waive treatment, pension, etc., and be freed". Died while A.W.L. 

 “Deceased Not Responsible for His Actions.” The circumstances attending the death of Walter P Cunningham (45), Benburb Street, an ex-Sergeant Major of the R.D.F., were investigated at an inquest held by the Coroner, Dr Louis Byrne, at the Morgue yesterday, when the jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical evidence, adding that they believed and agreed that the deceased was not responsible for his actions at the time. They exonerated Constable Wilson from any blame, and were very well satisfied with the way in which the police acted in taking the man to hospital, and with the action of the cabman, Owens. Deceased was arrested under sensational circumstances on Saturday morning at Westland Row Railway Station, and died subsequently at Mercer’s Hospital from the effects of a bullet wound received whilst he was effecting his escape from the police at Shankill, where it was alleged deceased had been caught in the act of committing a burglary in the house of Colonel Blood. Mr Cecil Forde said he was there on behalf of the R.I.C. to show that the police, at whose hands deceased obviously met his death, were justified in the course they took……Deceased’s Past……From Mr Fforde’s statement it appeared that the shot was fired by Constable Wilson, who with Sergeant Hurst, was on patrol duty in consequence of recent burglaries. Deceased had bee a Regimental Sergeant Major in the 10th R.D.F., and was discharged on March 2, as physically unfit, and had been suffering from shell-shock. Dr Delany said that death was due to internal haemorrhage and shock following the bullet wound. Mr William Byrne, solicitor, who represented the next of kin, wished to show deceased was not a criminal. If deceased was in Colonel Blood’s house on the morning in question and if he did commit a burglary, it was due to insanity. Mrs Cunningham, widow, said before deceased entered the army he was a gatekeeper on the M.G.W. Rly, at Ballina. He was through the South African War and also the present war. Since his discharge he was attending the George V Hospital every week. For some time her husband had shown signs of peculiarity and his mind appeared wrong. Mr Byrne read a certificate from Colonel Ferrar King, King George V Hospital, to the effect that Cunningham was suffering from neurasthenia.

Died after discharge. Discharged on 28/08/1917- no longer physically fit for war service-Neurasthenia (result of shell shock).

Died at Ballylegan, County Cork from neurasthenia 2 years cardiac failure 2 days certified. 

Died at Wicklow, from neurasthenia (Shell Shock) 4 years exhaustion certified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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