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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Private Patrick Ardagh, Royal Irish Fusiliers, S/N° 4801 (Boer War) and Field Bakery Section, ASC, S/N° S361978 (WW1)


George Millar

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Hello all,

I’m doing some research on the above soldier.  Patrick was born on the 13th April 1868 in Naas, Co Kildare, one of nine children to parents John Ardagh and Mary Ball.  Not much is known about his early life but in 1894 he decided to join the Royal Irish Fusiliers and was given the Service N° 4801. After training he joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Irish Fusiliers and on the 23rd October 1899 they sailed for South Africa.  Patrick took part in the South African War with the 2nd battalion and he returned back to the UK invalided on the 15th March 1902.  I can assume that he then went into the Army Reserve.

On the 5th February 1906 he married Bridget Nugent in St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church, Blessington, Co Wicklow and then settled down with his wife in Blessington where they raised six children.

During World War 1, he enlisted into the Royal Army Service Corps on the 31st August 1917 and given the Service N° S361978 which indicates the “Field Bakery Section”.  This was logical as in civilian life he worked as a “Baker”. He was discharged on the 3rd January 1919 under Para 392 (xvi) KR (no longer physically fit for war service) and awarded a silver war badge N° B79558.  According to the swb records, he never served overseas.  His medal index card doesn’t show that he was awarded any campaign medals so I presume this would indicate he didn’t leave Ireland during his service.

I noticed in the “long long trail” that there was a N° 66 Bakery Section at the Curragh Camp in Co Kildare and it seems logical that he might have been stationed there as it wasn’t far from where he lived.  I was wondering if it could be established from his Service N° if this is where he served.   Any thoughts or information would be appreciated.

After leaving the Army he returned back to civilian life but on the 27th December 1919 died from “chronic rheumatism and heart failure”.  He was only 51 years old when he died (his death record lists him as 48 years).

George

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he could equally have left Ireland but remained in the UK somewhere on the main land thus not qualifying for any medals as didnt serve in theatre 

albeit he served overseas from his perspective :thumbsup:

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Is he recorded by the CWGC?

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Hi Coldstreamer,

Thanks for the replies and sorry for the delay in replying.  No he isn't recorded on CWGC.  I presumed that as he had been discharged in January he was no longer considered as having died in service.  Do you think he should have been commemorated on their site?

George

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There are 3 cards of those recently published by WFA re pensions. Looks as though he died of artheroma of the arteries not attributable to his war service.

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Hi Mark,

Thanks for the info. From the medical definition of artheroma it gives "For most people, the first symptoms result from atheroma progression within the heart arteries, most commonly resulting in a heart attack and ensuing debility".   This ties in with the cause of death listed in his death record of "heart failure".

Thanks once again.

George

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The rule for post service CWGC commemoration is that cause of death was attributable to war service and death was on or before 31/8/21. Qualifies under the latter but not the former. So would not be formally recognised by CWGC.

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