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Bryn

AIF and NZEF deaths on hospital ships

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b3rn

Great! A fantastic piece of work. Thank you Frev.

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frev

Thank you Bern

 

I've no doubt there'll be some errors - but hopefully it'll be of some use to others in their research...

 

Cheers, Frev

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Bryn

Found this while going through some of my old copies of the 'Sydney Mail':

 

Text reads:

 

In forwarding the photograph of “Boat No. 705” to the “Mail,” a correspondent writes from Alexandria under date May 17 :- “Many of our dear lads went out to their last resting-place just at the outside edge of the harbour. It is a pathetic picture. I snapped it just as the boat was returning from its daily task of burying the dead, which it received from the hospital ship at anchor in the harbour. The bodies were covered with the Flag the gallant young fellows had given their lives for. A clergyman accompanied the vessel on each of its trips, and I could see the touching scene as the burial service was being read before the bodies were committed to their watery grave. War is indeed a rotten game, as I could not help thinking seeing those brave boys going ashore full of life, and being brought out on boat 705 to be buried, for sanitary reasons, at sea.”

 

 

boat_705.jpg.9fee0fd35b1d06db75c9474cab24039c.jpg

Edited by Bryn

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frev
7 hours ago, Bryn said:

In forwarding the photograph of “Boat No. 705” to the “Mail,” a correspondent writes from Alexandria under date May 17 :- “Many of our dear lads went out to their last resting-place just at the outside edge of the harbour. It is a pathetic picture. I snapped it just as the boat was returning from its daily task of burying the dead, which it received from the hospital ship at anchor in the harbour. The bodies were covered with the Flag the gallant young fellows had given their lives for. A clergyman accompanied the vessel on each of its trips, and I could see the touching scene as the burial service was being read before the bodies were committed to their watery grave. War is indeed a rotten game, as I could not help thinking seeing those brave boys going ashore full of life, and being brought out on boat 705 to be buried, for sanitary reasons, at sea.”

 

 

 

Many thanks for this Bryn - it gives me a much clearer picture on how the burial system worked (in regard to this paragraph in my history of the Gascon):

 

Forty deaths had occurred on the ship between the 10th and 19th of May, and most of the funeral services while the Gascon was still at anchor off Gallipoli, had been conducted by the Chaplains from HMS London (Rev A.C.W. Rose) or HMS Prince of Wales (Rev H.D.L. Viener).  On these occasions it’s possible that a funeral service hadn’t been carried out on the Gascon before the bodies had been lowered on to a trawler to be carried further out to sea for burial.

 

I might incorporate it at some stage if that's okay...

Cheers, Frev

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Bryn

Of course Frev. That’s why I put it there. I found a couple of references - in service dossiers - to burials at sea (off Alexandria) from a trawler. Will chase them up. 

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frev
2 hours ago, Bryn said:

Of course Frev. That’s why I put it there. I found a couple of references - in service dossiers - to burials at sea (off Alexandria) from a trawler. Will chase them up. 

 

I kind of figured that - but didn't want to assume! :thumbsup:

Have also just found some more British deaths...

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