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bonzillou

Questions about the Imperial Russian Army

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bonzillou

Hello

I'm doing some research on the Russian Artmy during the World War 1 and I thought that this fine community could help me with some wording.

 

My first question is about officers ranks.

Captain is Kapitán

Lieutnant is Poruchik. Could Leytenánt be used?

Could this two rankings be abbreviated (like Kpt and Por  or Leyt for example).

 

In an effort of romanization of some words I'd like to know if I'm right with these:

Guards: Gvardiya or GVARDII or GVARDEYSKIY ?
Riflemen--Strelkam or strelkovye ?

Could I use the word Komanda for a small detachment of soldiers, a crew (like the ones that would operate a machine gun?) or is it better to use vzvod (which stands for platoon)?

Gonyets: is this word correct for a runner, a messenger.

I've seen that the Maxim machine gun was called maksim or maxima. Which one is correct? (may be both!)

Greetings

Pascal

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James A Pratt III

I have never seen a abbreviation for Kapitan or Poruchik that doesn't mean there isn't one. If you don't get a reply here you might try the forum.axishistory.com. They have a section on the USSR and there are people who are Russians on it who might be able to help you on all of the above questions.

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bonzillou

Thanks a lot James for your reply

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jwsleser

From The Handbook of the Russian Army 1914 Appendix III.

 

On 20/01/2020 at 05:26, bonzillou said:

Captain is Kapitán

Lieutnant is Poruchik.

 

Yes, but Kapitan is spelled without the acute. 

 

On 20/01/2020 at 05:26, bonzillou said:

Could Leytenánt be used?

 

It is not given as an option. I have never seen it used 

 

On 20/01/2020 at 05:26, bonzillou said:

Could this two rankings be abbreviated (like Kpt and Por  or Leyt for example).

 

These (or any ranks) are not included in the list of abbreviations.

 

Guard - Gvardeiski

Rifleman - not used, likely private of rank and file - ryadovoi

Detachment is normally used for something larger, better section/squad - otdyelenie or merely section - otdyel

Runner isn't listed, possibly courier - feldyegerski

Maxim in cyrillic is Μаксим. I believe the a is added based on grammar in how it is used in a sentence (I don't speak Russia, I just have several Russian sources). The weapon is listed as Пулемт «Μаксим» обр. 1910 г.

 

v/r  Jeff

Edited by jwsleser

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bonzillou

Thanks Jeff!

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Dever Mayfly
On 20/01/2020 at 11:26, bonzillou said:

Hello

I'm doing some research on the Russian Artmy during the World War 1 and I thought that this fine community could help me with some wording.

 

My first question is about officers ranks.

Captain is Kapitán

Lieutnant is Poruchik. Could Leytenánt be used?

Could this two rankings be abbreviated (like Kpt and Por  or Leyt for example).

 

In an effort of romanization of some words I'd like to know if I'm right with these:

Guards: Gvardiya or GVARDII or GVARDEYSKIY ?
Riflemen--Strelkam or strelkovye ?

Could I use the word Komanda for a small detachment of soldiers, a crew (like the ones that would operate a machine gun?) or is it better to use vzvod (which stands for platoon)?

Gonyets: is this word correct for a runner, a messenger.

I've seen that the Maxim machine gun was called maksim or maxima. Which one is correct? (may be both!)

Greetings

Pascal

I was taught that a detachment was otriád and crew was ekipáž (rabočaia komandá was a fatigue party). I found total anarchy when researching English/French/American translations of Russian military terms and names in Siberia.  For example, the front line battle order in January 1919 has General Hanjin commanding the Western Army, but I have also found his name spelled as Hanzhin, Janzhin and Yanzhin.

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bonzillou
On 28/03/2020 at 12:29, Dever Mayfly said:

I found total anarchy when researching English/French/American translations of Russian military terms and names in Siberia. 

I agree with you!

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