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MikeyH

Self appointed 'expert'

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MikeyH

I feel sure we have all met them!  At an antiques event last year I partly withdrew a 'Gras' bayonet

from it's scabbard, to check the makers marking on the spine.  I was informed that this was the

name of the soldier that the weapon was originally issued to.  The stall holder gave me a very

odd look when I said I had one issued to the same person, but in a different year......

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeyH

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trajan

:thumbsup:

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4thVBGH

Gras bayonets seem to attract the stories.....One I was told in all seriousness relating to a Gras bayonet was that the makers mark related to a Prince from a Royal Household and it was his personal sidearm. Usually you can have a discussion where incorrect information can be corrected, but not this occasion.

 

Robert

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N White

I collect Gras Bayonets.

I have a lot of them.  Like, drawers full.

I have heard every dumb story you can imagine.

I find the best way to stop them (once I have determined it isn't one I need) is to just start info dumping.  As much truth as possible as fast as feasible.  Their eyes glaze, their mouths fall slack, and they run out of ********.

 

Because, it takes effort to make up stuff.  Reciting established info is far easier.

 

Even the ones that know, dont know how deep the rabbit hole goes.  Lots of weird Gras out there.

 

 

 

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MikeyH

I have also been informed a couple of times whilst looking at P1907 bayonets, that 1907 is the year of manufacture.....

 

Mike.

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Dave66
16 minutes ago, MikeyH said:

I have also been informed a couple of times whilst looking at P1907 bayonets, that 1907 is the year of manufacture.....

 

Mike.

I’ve heard that one a few times, and with regard 1907’s,  one dealer I go to is convinced the W we sometimes see impressed into the rear of the leather on the scabbard indicates it was issued to a Warden!!

 

Dave.

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trajan

I had a dealer over here trying to convince me a standard 'Gott Mitt Uns' buckle was an SS issue... He looked a little dumbfounded when I explained the SS would hardly be wearing a buckle saying "Tanrı bizimle" but was still flogging that line a month later... I guess some poor sucker bought it.

 

Trajan

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Sepoy

I once had a chap trying to sell me a 1914 - 15 Star (at a hugely inflated price) awarded to a member of a very rare unit - the Macedonian Field Artillery!
He completely disagreed with me when I pointed out that it was to a member of the Mercantile Fleet Auxiliary.

Sepoy

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peregrinvs

One of my favourites was the time a dealer at the Stoneleigh militaria fair tried to convince me that 'MW&S' (Martin Wright & Sons) marked WWII webbing was only issued to airborne troops. "I bet you didn't know that" he remarked to me knowingly. He was right...

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T8HANTS

Not a military story, but a mate of mine built a flat tank 1920's looking motorcycle, using a 1920's lawnmower engine and a period gearbox he had, but the rest was 1970's Honda and bits he made up.

After proving it was quite rideable, he thought he would show it a local bike show, just to see the reaction.  He got some stick on plastic transfers made and as his name was Powell, the bike became the "Flying Powell", but no other details were given.

As it happened I was nattering with him, when the flat-capped expert came up and after a few opening statements launched into a full history of the Powell Motorcycle works and their sad demise just before WW2.  It was incredible how a bike that was barely 6 weeks old as a whole, but did have some interesting parts, had gained so much history in such a short time.

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rflory

There are always the eBay sellers who think that a Great War pair to a "Gnr" are actually to a 'General."

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MikeyH

Not military, but last year I was browsing at a car boot, when I saw a nice framed period

photo of a town centre scene, I forget where.  The vendor had it labelled as 1930's.

I pointed out that the Wolseley 4/44 car in the foreground would put it in the 1950's.

I passed the stall again later and heard the vendor say to a punter that the photo had been

dated as 1950's 'by an expert'!

 

Mike.

 

Edited by MikeyH

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ss002d6252

As we're not in Skindles can we please keep the discussion on topic for the forum.

 

Craig

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Coldstreamer

I like the ww1 medals you see for sale to the  special boat service, SBS, better known as sick berth steward

Edited by Coldstreamer

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wainfleet
On 13/01/2020 at 13:37, MikeyH said:

I feel sure we have all met them!  At an antiques event last year I partly withdrew a 'Gras' bayonet

from it's scabbard, to check the makers marking on the spine.  I was informed that this was the

name of the soldier that the weapon was originally issued to.  The stall holder gave me a very

odd look when I said I had one issued to the same person, but in a different year......

 

Mike.

 

They don't like being corrected (Mr. Mainwaring!) and will often insist they are right in the face of incontrovertible evidence. Long ago and far away in a militaria shop now defunct, I was offered a "1914" shell dressing, the date having being added in the most childishly-obvious Letraset. I pointed this out but the owner was adamant that it was correct. I told him why the mention of a respirator being worn in 1914 made the date impossible. He ignored this and kept on repeating that it was correct. I suppose the conversation could have continued to its logical conclusion, but then I would have been unable to visit that shop again

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ianjonesncl

I am in possession of a 'genuine' WW1 Compass issued to the Royal Field Artillery.

My wife bought it as a birthday present......consequently for the sake of domestic harmony it is 'genuine'.

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MikB
40 minutes ago, ianjonesncl said:

.....consequently for the sake of domestic harmony it is 'genuine'.

 

I've got a framed pair of 'Waterloo field' musket balls that are that sort of genuine. Neither of them match contemporary British, French or Prussian musket calibre... :D

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OLD ROBIN HOOD

Greetings from Sherwood Forest

I think that the best example of this was when I was shown a "British WW1 bayonet " that a local collector had bought .

It was a nice saw back Butcher knife by SIMSON & CO . I had to explain in some detail that it belonged to the other side.

Still I suppose that we all have to learn.

 

                                                          Old Robin Hood

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museumtom

Not WW1 but one time a museum curator showed me silver Gaelic football medal inscribed to a match in 1885 (the first ever G.A.A. game). I looked up the proof marks showing it was made in 1955. Someone was telling porkies. The thing is the G.A.A. Museum in Thurles was chomping at the bit to get it.

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Alisonmallen62

We had a ww1 expert come to school with artefacts and he showed our students spurs found on the battlefield at Gallipoli belonging to someone from the 1st Australian Light Horse.  He said that these were found in 1915. He stated the horse was fired on and the rider fell with him but that there would have been many horses and riders during the first battles there.  I thought the 1st didn’t have horses  but went as infantry?  He said a few other questionable things and showed students pictures of ‘sticky bombs’ something like Saving Private Ryan style. 

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kmad

 

X is an unknown quantity in maths, and I also use this analogy when dealing with self appointed experts 

 

regards

 

Ken 

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MikeyH

A good few years ago, I was looking at a nice brass Lucas car side lamp.  The 

vendor claimed it was from a 1907 Alvis that had seen service as a WW1 staff

car.   I had to gently point out that the first Alvis was built in 1919.

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeyH

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4thVBGH

Its rather sad that all these stories still survive and thrive. Its never been easier to even do a basic Google search.....On the other side of the equation is the collector that says they've just paid $500 for a particular item, and then asks what it is......

 

Robert

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chaz

I won a trio from our local auction house , on receipt I rang to say the star had been erased , their first reply was that their expert has confirmed that it was just heavily worn and polished, their second reply was their caveat, the pictures form part of the description, but you could not read the picture details.

I might have swallowed it but the heavily worn remaining markings on the star bore no resemblance tohis name or number.

I still have the trio..

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