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Remembered Today:

Petroc

Captain James Snell, Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment

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Petroc

Dear All, 

 

Would any Pals have any information as to when and where the above was awarded his two MC's? I believe that Captain Snell, who had previously served as an NCO in a Supply unit of the ASC, was Battalion Adjutant of the 7th Queen's in mid-1918, by which time he had already been awarded the first Military Cross, and that he probably won the second of his decorations during the Battle of Amiens. They were gazetted in September and November 1918, but beyond this I'm a bit in the dark so any pointers would be greatly received!

 

Many thanks,

 

Andy   

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GraemeClarke

Hi Andy,

 

All here, dates, places and deeds,

 

Regards,

 

Graeme

 

 

Image1.jpg

Image2.jpg

Image3.jpg

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Petroc

Graeme; brilliant! Many thanks,

Andy

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GraemeClarke

Hi

 

Just making sure you know the place and date of the deed are under the citations.

 

Regards

 

Graeme

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sadbrewer

Just to add this......if it's the correct J E Snell of course....courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive. 

From January 1915.

Screenshot_20191121-183603.jpg

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Petroc

Yup, spotted them thanks, mate,

 

Andy

1 minute ago, sadbrewer said:

Just to add this......if it's the correct J E Snell of course....courtesy of the British Newspaper Archive. 

From January 1915.

Screenshot_20191121-183603.jpg

Wow..could be..thank you!

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HarryBrook

He was also twice mentioned in despatches, first as a Sergeant in the Army Service Corps, May 1917, https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30101/supplement/5319

and secondly as Temp. Capt., 7th Bn. Royal West Surrey Regt. in July 1919 https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/31439/supplement/8580

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Petroc

Many thanks, a gallant bloke indeed; seems he also served in some reserve capacity in the Second World War, receiving a letter of thanks from 'Monty' for his work in supervising cadet units in the West Midlands

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BFBSM

I believe the second  citation would refer to the actions detailed within this quote from the History of the Queen’s Royal (West Surrey) Regiment in the Great War, H. C. Wylly, (N& M Reprint):

 

Quote

p.230

The Fourth Army at this time contained, in order from right to left, the Canadian Corps, the Australian Corps, and. north of the Somme. the III Corps, this last being composed of the 58th. 47th. and 18th Divisions in the front line, with the 12th in support. To the 18th Division was given the task of capturing the high ground along the Bray—Corbie ridge so as to form a protective flank fur the main Fourth Army attack.

Six tanks had been told off to accompany the 7th The Queen's, who were especially concerned with the capture of the ground north of the Bray—Corbie road, but the tanks failed to arrive at the appointed time. By 3.40 on the 8th the Battalion was in position, one wave in front of and three behind Burke Trench, and almost at once a heavy enemy barrage came down, causing several casualties. For some time the situation was very obscure, and many officers and runners sent forward to report became casualties ; and at 7 a.m. Lieutenant-Colonel Bushell went forward himself with his runner to deal with the situation. Collecting all available men, he led them forward from Croydon Trench to the assault, capturing Cloncurry Trench between Culgor and Cloud Support. He then proceeded along the trench to organize and encourage the men. and on his way to give orders to a tank, which had now arrived, as to the next move, he was mortally wounded by a sniper. " His runner. Private A. E. Morris, a gallant soldier whose knowledge of the country was instinctive, who earlier in the day had led the advance platoons to their assaulting positions and had been at Colonel Bushell's elbow when he first came to clear up the situation, rushed across the open to where his colonel lay. and though the ground across which he carried the colonel was swept by hostile machine-gun fire, he brought him in. But it was a heroism that counted for nothing. Colonel Bushell had been fatally wounded."

Colonel Ransome of the Buffs, was now placed in command of all the troops in the forward area, and by his orders Captain Snell went forward and reported the situation as follows :—Captain Simmons. " C " Company of The Queen's, with Company Sergeant-Major Knight. " D " Company, and about 100 men were in Cloncurry Trench ; the trench about the Bray—Corbie road was empty, and Captain Simmons was directed to dispose his men in Cloncurry Trench from Cloud Support to the Bray—Corbie road.   Captain Snell formed the opinion that men of The p.231 Queen's had reached their objective, and that if immediate action was taken the Battalion flank objective could be gained.

Captain Snell, being ordered to try to effect this, calling to the men in Cloncurry Trench to follow him. led them down the trench, he, with two men. working in the open to the north, while Captain Hayfield moved on the   south, but his party was met by machine-gun and rifle fire. He then sent the men forward while he. With a non-commissioned officer and six men, went on down the trench running north to form a bomb stop, when the enemy commenced retiring and the line was occupied and organized. About five in the afternoon a brigade of the 12th Division passed through the line held by The Queen's, encircled Morlancourt, and captured the ridge beyond.

In the 7th The Queen's 4 officers and 24 other ranks had been killed. 6 officers and 140 non-commissioned officers and men had been wounded. 68 men were gassed, and 7 were suffering from shell-shock—a total of 275 all ranks. The officers killed were Lieutenant-Colonel C. Bushell. V.C.. D.S.O.. Lieutenant D. Holman Middlesex Regiment, attached). Second-Lieutenants P. V. Cooper and H. M. Barber (East Surrey Regiment, attached). Wounded were Captain L. G. Stedman, M.C., Second-Lieutenants J. T. Lancaster, W. M. Watson,  J. S. Adams, W. L Atkinson and H. P. Clarke, M.C.

 

Mark

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