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Heidi_mac

Help with markings on a 18PR shell casing

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Heidi_mac

Hi. I was wondering if someone could tell me what all the markings on this casing mean - i do not have any military knowledge but am guessing this is from a British 18 pounder cannon.  It looks like is may have been refilled a few times is this correct? I thought the OMG might be the company but could not find anything about this.  I have had these for years from grandparents who I think used as door stops!

Thanks in advance.  Heidi

IMG_2249.JPG

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peregrinvs

That’s had an busy life. Amongst other things it appears to have a 1920’s dated primer.

 

The experts will be along soon to give you a full translation, but I believe it’s Canadian, was inspected on 28 August 1917, was reloaded once, was modified from original spec (* marking next to the MkII), has been annealed and had a stereoscope test. I believe OMG is a batch code.

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Heidi_mac

Thanks for your help.  I have another one that also has a lot of markings on it. What tells you the origin - as you mentioned above Canadian? 

IMG_2251.JPG

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14276265

The first case was made by one of four production lines at the Canadian Cartridge Co., Hamilton, Canada - the CCS monogram at 3 o'clock. It was made in 1917 and accepted for filling 22 August 1917, passed by inspector 6, with Canadian acceptance stamp applied (broad arrow in a C). The lot code is OMG -  xxx a letter incrementing code for each lot of 400 cartridge cases made; the previous lot would have been OMF and the following OMH. 

 

It was filled twice. On return to UK after first firing it was repaired at Royal Arsenal, Woolwich - RL in a rectangle, and ultimately stored, filled and re-primed in or after 1925. The No.1 MkII primer was made at Woolwich November 1924 and filled May 1925. The A in a diamond denotes low temperature annealing at first repair and the S in a diamond a hardness test using a Scleroscope.

 

The second case was made by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick plant, Newcastle-on-Tyne  - EOC monogram. Made in 1918, lot identifier A3754. It has been filled three times - two refills, both by Woolwich. It has been low temperature annealed twice (A in diamond ad two punch marks above the 18pr) and hardness tested (S in a diamond). There are abundant acceptance stamps of arrows with numbers and/or letters.

 

The primer markings are interesting but are WWII dated so not up for discussion. (Any explanation of WWII markings will invite one particular moderator to immediately lock the thread.)

 

 

 

265

Edited by 14276265

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Heidi_mac

Thanks so much for all the information, really appreciate it.

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