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Great War Fictional Movies

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Gunner Bailey
7 minutes ago, Nick Beale said:

For another with a French army setting (ableit starring the not-very-French Kirk Douglas) there's Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory".

 

I saw it a few years ago and thought it was not one of Kubrick's best. A strong film though.

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Hyacinth1326

'King and Country'  starring Dirk and Tom.  Leo McKern played a medic who was the very antithesis of Chavasse.  Indeed the entire film owed more to sixties right-on culture than the realities of the Great War.

Edited by Hyacinth1326

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Hedley Malloch
1 hour ago, Hyacinth1326 said:

'King and Country'  starring Dirk and Tom.  Leo McKern played a medic who was the very antithesis of Chavasse.  Indeed the entire film owed more to sixties right-on culture than the realities of the Great War.

 

Hyacinth,

interesting. Would you care to elaborate on this?

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Hyacinth1326
On 16/09/2019 at 20:49, Hedley Malloch said:

 

Hyacinth,

interesting. Would you care to elaborate on this?

 

Would you care to consider the work and ideology of Joseph Losey ? 

 

View 'The Servant' then look for resonance with King and Country. The one is after all a pendant to the other.  Ideology signposted a mile off. A simple  discourse of homoerotic angst suffused with Brechtian themes. And WWI supplies plenty of ammo for them. In this view the characters are reduced to cyphers.  O' Sullivan an ill-conceived stereotype, crude even by agit prop standards. A bourgeois drunken thug serving as a foil to the sensitive Dirk. Hamp an innocent shorn of agency.  Without a shred of revolutionary consciousness he is doomed and his mates will die 'as cattle'.  A Billy Budd of the trenches. The other soldiers are reduced to war-coarsened lumpenproletariat . Dirk is the Mother Courage figure  Men like him could stop the war but instead he goes along with it for 'King and Country'. Subtle Not.

 

Is it still interesting Dr Malloch ? I could go on but by deploying this kind of jargon I am even boring myself here.

 

It's magnificent but it isn't history. 

There again you knew that all along, you little tinker.

Edited by Hyacinth1326

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Hedley Malloch

Ah, now  I understand. I had considered that your original comments referred to another and altogether different interpretive lens - lions and donkeys, butchers and bunglers - you know, that sort of thing. That was premature of me. Sorry to have bored you :-)

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593jones

How about 'Les Croix de Bois' (1932).  I  haven't seen it myself, but I understand it is highly thought of.

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