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Remembered Today:

Wheels from which nation


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Hi

does anyone have any knowledge of these wheels.... type, what they’re off a2063DDF8-523B-41DD-A75A-667E4F0443E6.jpeg.7cb5124e3d12273507de77b886938bdb.jpegBC875893-C15E-4BE7-A23E-5B5A1A2E5BE5.jpeg.bb333d08c2031a09b11c3054244703c2.jpegF49810FD-02E5-427A-867F-C3C87273C215.jpeg.ff782fc5ac92231b874ebc96d6822a9c.jpegnd country of origin etc

many thanks 

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I don't think that they are British, because they have an odd number of spokes. Also, judging by the photos I have, they aren't German either.

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton
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Hi Ron

looks like you are in the same position as I am as I didn't think them to be British(wrong hub and spoke numbers) not German for similar reasons. Perhaps French but I believe them to be military as opposed to civilian.

regards

Dave 

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A very important ID factor would be the height of the wheel and the width of the steel tire.

new3.2

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Hi

they’re not overly high around 3feet or so and 2 inches wide

regards

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Thanks Dave, will go measure my very small group of WW1 wheels.  I think the US 2.9" Vickers mountain gun used that size wheel, perhaps more, as it was all so used on the early US 75mm pack howitzer.

Ken

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the 75mm Pack Howitzer on M1 carriage had more spokes, ditto the mountain gun.  Are we barking up the wrong tree and they are cart wheels of some sort and not off a Gun carriage with 7 spokes I would think they were quite weak?

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They could also be an early truck/car wheel. The way the steel clamp plates that bolt through the fellows to the steel tyres are shaped is likely to be a critical design feature to allow the original use to be identified. They are definitely not British/Commonwealth. I do not think that they are German.

 

Cheers

Ross

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I have found some pictures of WW2 German artillery. A number of the lower-calibre weapons (5cm and 7.5cm, whether infantry guns, mountain guns or anti-tank guns) have wheels which, in effect, each consist of two wheels mounted back-to-back, with five or seven spokes each but mounted in such a way as to make the whole wheel one of ten or fourteen spokes. The WW2 versions, as might be expected, have rubber tyres but it is not impossible that what we have here is a WW1 version of one of these, with iron tyre bands.

 

Do any of our German Pals have any illustrations of WW1 smaller-calibre guns?

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton
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