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Phill Jones

Admission and Discharge Book ,l Record meaning of abbreviation

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Phill Jones

I am trying to understand the meaning of an abbreviation in Admission and Discharge Book, see attached   . In the Diseases ,wounds and injuries column , what does NYD (P) R mean  for 31820 F Embrey .top of page 

 

thank you 

S2_GBM_MH106_MH106-149_0007.jpg

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Alan24

Not Yet Diagnosed? 

 

Alan 

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PRC
Posted (edited)

For these old eyes thats a bit difficult to make out other than it looks like the same phrase repeated several times down the column.

 

N.Y.D is fairly standard and equals Not Yet Diagnosed.

The rest I suspect is particular to the medical unit concerned.

 

I've taken a cut of the image and upped the contrast .

My best guess, particularly given the period is:-

(P) = Pneumonia. In brackets as a tentative diagnosis.

R = Respiratory.

 

But please remember that is only my guess (if I got it wrong :-).

 

Cheers,

Peter

 

S2_GBM_MH106_MH106-149_0007.jpg.fe9a6937400f517332c5f67b3439cc4f.jpg

Edited by PRC
Typo

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ss002d6252

As it's NYD I would suggest that the P stands for Pyrexia rather than Pneumonia.

 

Craig

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PRC
7 minutes ago, ss002d6252 said:

As it's NYD I would suggest that the P stands for Pyrexia rather than Pneumonia.

 

Craig

 Craig,

 

Equally valid. I did consider it but discounted it on the basis that I would normally expect to see PUO (Pyrexia of unknown origin) rather than NYD but terminology changes or it may have been specific to this medical unit that this term was used. Plus I guess there must be a stage with a raised temperature that isn't a fever and the healthcare professional involved may have been hedging their bets.

 

Good to know that some things never change :-)

 

Cheers,

Peter

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ss002d6252
1 minute ago, PRC said:

 Craig,

 

Equally valid. I did consider it but discounted it on the basis that I would normally expect to see PUO (Pyrexia of unknown origin) rather than NYD but terminology changes or it may have been specific to this medical unit that this term was used. Plus I guess there must be a stage with a raised temperature that isn't a fever and the healthcare professional involved may have been hedging their bets.

  

Good to know that some things never change :-)

 

Cheers,

Peter

Sometimes I think they didn't know themselves what they meant either Peter ! I often think that what one person wrote at one end was not the same interpretation given at the other .

 

Craig

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TEW

I think this is an FA book in Salonica? Don't know what it is but would that make Pyrexia more likely? Some were returned to duty, others to CCS which seems to indicate degrees of severity.

Wonder if checking other pages could help, might there be some NYD (P) L - left?

TEW

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PRC

 

8 hours ago, TEW said:

I think this is an FA book in Salonica? Don't know what it is but would that make Pyrexia more likely? Some were returned to duty, others to CCS which seems to indicate degrees of severity.

Wonder if checking other pages could help, might there be some NYD (P) L - left?

TEW

 

Part of my reason for suggesting Pneumonia rather than Pyrexia is my understanding that another wave of the Spanish flu swept round the world in the early summer months of 1919. Could simply be a case of making the wrong connection on my part. I too wondered if there my be a right or left connotation involved but couldn't see how it would apply to either pneumonia or pyrexia. Left or right would normally imply some kind of physical condition.  My first thought was psoriasis, but knowing left or right wouldn't really help, same with pulmonary. Possibly at a pinch there is patella, but as with all of them, then why would so many men have the same physical problem at the same time.

 

12 hours ago, ss002d6252 said:

Sometimes I think they didn't know themselves what they meant either Peter ! I often think that what one person wrote at one end was not the same interpretation given at the other .

 

Craig

 

Tell me about it. I've never worked for or with an organisation big or small, public or private, that didn't have it's own internal jargon, and part of the pleasure sometimes has been spotting senior managers nodding sagely like they understand it completely while you see the panic in their eyes. And oh the scope for confusion it caused. One of my favourites was when I was working for an IT outsourcer providing data network services to FTSE 100 customers. One of the customers provided financial services. The company concerned had some years previously purchased a software company which predicted market movements in real time. It earned my customer 100 of millions a year but needed to run on air gapped servers on the customers site rather than on the corporate network in our data centres. To support the base software, (the machine operating system), we were asked to provide a team of engineers 24*7*365 ensuring at any given time there was a "man on site". As this was a contractually provided service there were service level agreements for time to fix faults as well as carry out business as usual moves and changes. In the monthly service management data provided to the customer this was also all aggregated to give a monthly operating score. So in the everyday jargon of the business the MoS for the MOS had a MOS - simple really and I was the only one who couldn't say it and keep a straight face :-)

 

Cheers,

Peter

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TEW

The book is for 66th FA 4/6/18 to 1/2/19 with the NYD (P) R entry throughout the book. It has been written by different hands.

 

Variations are;

 

NYD (P) - NYD PR - NYD P/R - NYD PP. There is an example of NYD (P)R that has been added later in red pen to the entries either for Sprain R Knee or Cut Finger L.

 

Another example has NYD (P)R circled in red pen with exclamation mark. Another with NYD (P) R Diarrhoea.

 

NYD HB(D), NYD (C) are further examples.

 

NYD PP or NYD P/P could be Peripatetic?

 

Perhaps 66th FA diary has more info?

TEW

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Phill Jones

Thank you to all who replied to this thread , it seems the jury is still out on this one , it seems the soldier in question had previously suffered a wound see attached , he is local to me and made it home , thank you all  

S2_GBM_ROYALWELSHFUSILIERS_CASUALTYRECORDS1RWF1914_A-E_0151.jpg

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TEW

I think the entry circled in red with exclamation mark was marked as such by the Statistical branch of the Medical research Committee post war as they didn't know what it meant.

 

Quote

NYD PP or NYD P/P could be Peripatetic?

 

Don't think I was thinking of the right thing here, think Paratyphoid is what I meant.

TEW

 

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