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Jools mckenna

What was the German equivalent to the Kodak vest pocket autographic?

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Jools mckenna

I know the VPK was small enough to get past the army's no camera rule. But I know the Germans didn't have that rule and the Germans were allowed cameras, so could they get away with more? What was the popular camera with the average German soldier? 

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AOK4

Officially, one needed a permit to use a camera, but the permits were very easily handed out...

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GreyC
Posted (edited)

There were loads on offer. Most usual negative sizes ranged from 4x4,5cm to 6x6 to 6x9 up to 9x12 and 13x18cm for amateurs. At the front negative sizes were usually at the lower end. During the war experience made the soldiers use increasingly the cameras that worked with roll-film, not with glass-plates. The publications for amateur photographers were full of advice for the soldiers during the war. Ernemann-Bob, Ica, Kodak, Goerz were among the more popular brands, but not the only ones.

 

I am always interested in buying permits like the ones AOK4 mentioned above, by the way or other photos/documents that are showing or dealing with photography during WW1.

GreyC

Photo shows celebration of truce of Russian and German troops, camera at the right corner.

1274805381_xDeutschRussischeVerbruderungKameraSchlagzeug.jpg.96d425491aad64b9f63bc9f798600d86.jpg

 

 

Edited by GreyC

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Jools mckenna

Thanks Grey, any chance on seeing a scan of one of those permits?

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GreyC

Not from me, I am afraid, I have two but they are not digitized and not available right now.

GreyC

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Jools mckenna

Ok, fair enough. 

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Jools mckenna

Also, I did suspect that both sides used Kodak cameras but confirmation is very interesting.

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Gunner Bailey

I believe the German had a 'point and shoot' made by to a design by Maxim

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Radlad
On ‎13‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 19:46, Jools mckenna said:

I know the VPK was small enough to get past the army's no camera rule. But I know the Germans didn't have that rule and the Germans were allowed cameras, so could they get away with more? What was the popular camera with the average German soldier? 

 

Germany at that time was at the forefront of camera design and manufacture , there were a myriad of models, both box and folding, available in the years just before WW1. some of the more prominent makers were Goertz, Dallmeyer, Contessa, Steinheil and last but not least Nettel, whose 'Picolette' model was very popular. A google search of those other makes will show examples of what was available. There were many more smaller makers.

I would imagine that the average German soldier was not that interested in photography but for those that were, so many suitable cameras were available that it would be hard to guess. I suspect that film supply would be more of a problem as the war went on.

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tbirduk

Leica started producing the first 35mm film camera in 1914 before the war started, it was designed to be smaller than box cameras for use by Hikers. How many made theeir way to the front is difficult to tell. Iamge of 1914 model is available in the wikipedia article on the company.

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Radlad
23 minutes ago, tbirduk said:

Leica started producing the first 35mm film camera in 1914 before the war started, it was designed to be smaller than box cameras for use by Hikers. How many made theeir way to the front is difficult to tell. Iamge of 1914 model is available in the wikipedia article on the company.

 

Rubbish. the leica camera using 35mm film stock was initially designed in 1913 and only a very few factory prototypes were produced over the next 10 years. it was finally released on to the market about 1925. Not difficult to tell how many made it to the front,,,,,,, the answer is NONE

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Gunner Hall
On 15/06/2019 at 07:46, Gunner Bailey said:

I believe the German had a 'point and shoot' made by to a design by Maxim

Another gem, lost forever......

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