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Remembered Today:

Fattyowls

The Date (and time) of the 1955 Mine Explosion at Ploegsteert

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Marilyne

What page should we look at??? the link related to a repository of 79 pages of 25 entries …

 

M;

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Skipman
12 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

What page should we look at??? the link related to a repository of 79 pages of 25 entries …

 

M;

 

Sorry that was just an example. I have no idea if it could be on any page, but worth a look, I thought, if you speak the lingo.

 

Mike

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Marilyne

ah… OK…

I tried a quick search by putting in the exact words of the titel in the Advanced search but to no avail…

 

M.

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Skipman
8 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

ah… OK…

I tried a quick search by putting in the exact words of the titel in the Advanced search but to no avail…

 

M.

 

Yes don'tt think it's straight forward. Perhaps an expert in the language might be able to find something.

 

Mike

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Fattyowls
8 hours ago, walbeer said:

Voici une photo quelques jours après l'explosion.

 

Merci beaucoup Walbeer. Mon ami Jack Thorpe de Erquinghem-Lys pédalé pour voir le cratère avec son père en 1955. Je vais lui envoyer le lien vers la photo.

 

Pete.

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Fattyowls
6 hours ago, Marilyne said:

Thanks for tagging me in this........and even longer since I was there, but the topic is still interesting.

 

But it's even more interesting to think about the fact that some mines are still there… what's the probability of them still exploding today?? And how??

This one was triggered by lightning striking nearby. What could eventually trigger the remaining mines to blow??

 

My pleasure Marilyne, I thought you would be interested given your expertise. Have you been back since we were there four years ago (where has the time gone)? As for the mines still there my understanding is that they were charged with ammonal which is hygroscopic so the danger of explosion would depend on how waterproof the containers are after 102 years and of course the prospect of lightning striking twice in the same area.

 

Pete.

 

3 hours ago, Skipman said:

Don't kno how good your French is Pete

 

Mon Français est très très pauvre mon ami.......I use a translator so we can keep Walbeer in the loop, it's good of him to help out

 

The French newspaper resource is another great find*. I'm sure that will come in handy for all of us if we can get the hang of it.

 

Pete.

* I hope you didn't have to search too long. I have visions of the good citizens of Aberfeldy wondering why the kettle was taking so long to boil......;)

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Skipman
4 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

* I hope you didn't have to search too long. I have visions of the good citizens of Aberfeldy wondering why the kettle was taking so long to boil......;)

 

At the moment time is one thing I have plenty of, nursing a severely bashed knee. Is it time for a coffee already? Yes, I suppose it is.

 

Mike

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Fattyowls
1 minute ago, Skipman said:

 

At the moment time is one thing I have plenty of, nursing a severely bashed knee. Is it time for a coffee already? Yes, I suppose it is.

 

Mike

 

Sorry to hear that Mr S, hope it gets better soon. I have visions of the mighty Skipman search engine draining all the electricity from the greater Aberfeldy metro area......

 

Pete.

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Skipman
Just now, Fattyowls said:

 

Sorry to hear that Mr S, hope it gets better soon. I have visions of the mighty Skipman search engine draining all the electricity from the greater Aberfeldy metro area......

 

Pete.

 

Ha ha! Am on mend. Wouldn't recommend falling full force on the knee though.

 

Cheers Mike

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Marilyne
1 hour ago, Fattyowls said:

. Have you been back since we were there four years ago (where has the time gone)?

 

 

 

Only to run the Armistice Day half marathon 2 years ago in Ploegsteert.

Closest I came was last year's Yzer which passed at Messines

 

M.

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Fattyowls

From my friend Jack Thorpe in Erquinghem-Lys (who cycled with his father and cousin to the crater in 1955).

Lors d'un orage le 17 Juillet dans la soiree le foudre s'abattit sur un pylon et provoquer l'explosion d'une de ces mines de chemin des Loups de Warenton

During a thunderstorm on July 17 in the evening lightning fell on a pylon and cause the explosion of one of these mines of the way of the Wolves of Warenton

The source is I think our sister forum in France. I really like the idea of the way of the Wolves, sounds like it should be on the approach to the Molyneux. Bing translator comes up with another gem. So the evening of the 17th July 1955 it is. Thanks to everyone who contributed to what I think may be the definitive account. Grumpy's mega contribution in particular will be cut and pasted into the homework of generations to come......:thumbsup:

Pete.

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Muerrisch

Grumpy's mega contribution in particular will be cut and pasted into the homework of generations to come..

 

I do hope that they tidy it up first!  The original was not brilliant, but the GWF software has done it no favours.

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Fattyowls
59 minutes ago, Muerrisch said:

Grumpy's mega contribution in particular will be cut and pasted into the homework of generations to come..

 

I do hope that they tidy it up first!  The original was not brilliant, but the GWF software has done it no favours.

 

Well I'll be referring back to it regardless. Software induced warts and all.

 

Thanks again,

 

Pete.

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Muerrisch

Thank you.

 

Military Mining can be tackled as a mental exercise by anybody, as an exercise in "common sense".

 

The variables are:

 

what sort of explosive [how much bang for the buck]

how much explosive

how deep

and, less obvious but central to the job:

"soil characteristics"

 

The RE officer needed to be guided as to what sort of hole was needed of course.

 

Compared with that sort of problem, my profession, weather  forecasting, was a doddle.

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Fattyowls

Just to get the last piece of the jigsaw as they say, my friend Jack contacted his friend Marino at the Museum in Mesen and he confirmed that the 1955 explosion was 17th July and said that it was around 16.00:

 

La mine aurait explosé le 19-07-1955 vers 16 H 00 près du Chemin des Loups entre le hameau du  St Yvon et du Gheer. (Warneton).

 

Good enough for me. My thanks to Jack and Marino, and all the contributors to this thread.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. When I get a moment I am going to look into the mine at the Dump, I'd assumed that that bit of the cutting spoil was in allied hands throughout but clearly not, thanks @Doug504. With regard to the other unexploded mines I know the Petit Douvre Farm one is full of water because messrs Barton and Doyle put a camera down it for Channel 4 if I remember correctly when they were digging the village up a few years back. The second Peckham mine was lost to the wet sand the Germans called the schwimsand. I'm sure I've read somewhere that ammonal is hygroscopic so those two should hopefully be inert, but the remaining three Birdcage ones may still be a risk. Might raise the pulse rate a little next time I'm in the area....:unsure:

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walbeer

Sorry Mario, la date reprise dans ce blog est érronée   explosion le 17 juillet 1955.  Walbeer.  (Warneton SHCWR)

TRENCH C.JPG

TRENCH A.JPG

TRENCH B.JPG

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andrew pugh

Hi

Why don't you contact the Durand Group, im pretty sure they would know.

Regards

Andy

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Doug504
On 10/06/2019 at 20:36, Fattyowls said:

 

P.S. When I get a moment I am going to look into the mine at the Dump, I'd assumed that that bit of the cutting spoil was in allied hands throughout but clearly not, thanks @Doug504. With regard to the other unexploded mines I know the Petit Douvre Farm one is full of water because messrs Barton and Doyle put a camera down it for Channel 4 if I remember correctly when they were digging the village up a few years back. The second Peckham mine was lost to the wet sand the Germans called the schwimsand. I'm sure I've read somewhere that ammonal is hygroscopic so those two should hopefully be inert, but the remaining three Birdcage ones may still be a risk. Might raise the pulse rate a little next time I'm in the area....:unsure:

Apologies for late response. You are correct in thinking the dump was in allied hands throughput the war. However, there was concern in May 1915 that pressure was building and the dump, along with the front lines at Hill 60 may be lost. The decision to mine the dump was taken as a precaution in the event that this happened and to prevent Germans subsequently using the dump as an observation post. 

Doug.

5E422B8B-FBAE-4FC6-8DDC-7AA1FC27D262.jpeg

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