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bigjo

WW1 Incendiary Aerial Bomb???

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Gunner Bailey

Is it for dropping messages from aircraft? I'd not heard of incendiaries being used by the British in WW1.

 

Nice find.

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Dave66
Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Gunner Bailey said:

Is it for dropping messages from aircraft? I'd not heard of incendiaries being used by the British in WW1.

 

Nice find.

I tend to agree, an aerial message canister.

The other evening I was trawling through some of the sites on militariamart looking for Horsa pilots notes and saw something similar listed, but I'll be blown if I can find it again.

 

Dave.

 

Wilkie and Paul Edinburgh...https://www.gracesguide.co.uk/Wilkie_and_Paul

Edited by Dave66

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bigjo
3 hours ago, Gunner Bailey said:

Is it for dropping messages from aircraft? I'd not heard of incendiaries being used by the British in WW1.

 

Nice find.

Royal Flying Corps
MEASUREMENTSLength 14.2 cm, Outside Diameter 2.4 cm
CAPTIONIncendiary Aerial Bomb
ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONThis British 6 1/2 ounce incendiary bomb would have been dropped on ammunition depots, wood piles, or other stockpiles in order to start fires.

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bigjo

Royal Flying Corps
MEASUREMENTSLength 14.2 cm, Outside Diameter 2.4 cm
CAPTIONIncendiary Aerial Bomb
ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONThis British 6 1/2 ounce incendiary bomb would have been dropped on ammunition depots, wood piles, or other stockpiles in order to start fires.

19390002-681-608x864.jpeg

19390002-681a-559x864.jpeg

  • CAPTIONIncendiary Aerial Bomb
  • ADDITIONAL INFORMATIONThis British 6 1/2 ounce incendiary bomb would have been dropped on ammunition depots, wood piles, or other stockpiles in order to start fires.

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bigjo

if you look at it,,  the bottom is missing  and the fins that have been put on the top . should be  the other way round if you look you can see the two holes near the fins the one i have  is complete  it has nothing in the case 

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Gunner Bailey

 

 

OK cancel the message container :innocent:.

 

I've found reference to this in a WW2 EOD manual dated 1942. It is listed as being obsolete at that date and the colour scheme for the outside was unknown.

 

They were dropped in containers aimed at 'light frame construction' huts or tents probably. There is no reference to how many were dropped in the container.

 

The fin shape is different and has a dome shaped cap over the fins. The hollow structure allowed a large cartridge to be inserted via the nose.

 

If someone can unearth a photo of the cannister slung under a WW1 aircraft I'd accept it as WW1 but I tend to think it may have been inter war period, the sort of thing we dropped over the middle east or Afghanistan.

 

 

 

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bigjo
6 minutes ago, Gunner Bailey said:

 

 

OK cancel the message container :innocent:.

 

I've found reference to this in a WW2 EOD manual dated 1942. It is listed as being obsolete at that date and the colour scheme for the outside was unknown.

 

They were dropped in containers aimed at 'light frame construction' huts or tents probably. There is no reference to how many were dropped in the container.

 

The fin shape is different and has a dome shaped cap over the fins. The hollow structure allowed a large cartridge to be inserted via the nose.

 

If someone can unearth a photo of the cannister slung under a WW1 aircraft I'd accept it as WW1 but I tend to think it may have been inter war period, the sort of thing we dropped over the middle east or Afghanistan.

 

 

 

THANK YOU FOR THE INFO .THE ONE IN THE PHOTO IS IN THE CANADA WAR MUSEUM  NOT IN UK . HAVE PHONED THE IWM IN UK  AND THEY ARE LOOKING IN TO IN AND SHOULD GET SOME INFO BACK , ,THANK YOU , AS YOU CAN SEE THAT THE ONE IN THE PHOTO IS NOT COMPLETE 

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Gunner Bailey

Here's a quick photo from the EOD manual. As you can see there are two sizes 5oz Mk I and 6.5 oz Mk II.

 

RSCN1860.JPG.37ba6089ee6be4c7a3e916405a8c477b.JPG

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14276265

It is a British 6 1/2 oz Baby Incendiary, a circa 1918 cluster bomblet. First and last pages of Aerial Bombs, Leaflet 12 attached. Also a drawing from an Armament Training Manual, 1927/

 

 

 

265

BI_1.jpg

BI_2.jpg

BI_3.jpg

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Gunner Bailey

Interesting dates Tom. Possibly introduced as the war moved from static to mobile. I've never seen the cannister in WW1 photos and it would be interesting to see if any were actually used in action. I imagine the best target would have been German aerodromes with soft skinned buildings and the aircraft themselves.

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Dave66

And there was me thinking incendiary bombs were only  a WW2 thing!

Thanks all for the lesson, extremeley interesting.

 

Dave.

 

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Gunner Bailey
Posted (edited)

We all can learn something every day here. I do!

Edited by Gunner Bailey

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MikeMeech

Hi

 

The book 'Bombs Gone' by MacBean & Hogben has a drawing of both the bomb and container on page 34.  On page 37 it mentions that the Independent Force dropped about 816,000 during WW1.  The containers appear to have come in two sizes; 144 bombs in four layers and a larger one with 272 bombs.  They were meant to be carried inside an aircraft such as a HP O/400, DH.9 or DH.10.  Post War some containers appear to be fitted under the wings of DH.9a aircraft of No. 30 Sqn.  I seem to recall there being a photo of a container beneath a FE.2b or d, probably for trial purposes, if I find it I shall give a reference.

 

Mike

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Gunner Bailey
1 hour ago, MikeMeech said:

  They were meant to be carried inside an aircraft such as a HP O/400, DH.9 or DH.10.  Post War some containers appear to be fitted under the wings of DH.9a aircraft of No. 30 Sqn.

 

Mike

 

That probably explains the lack of photos during the war.

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bigjo
3 hours ago, Gunner Bailey said:

Here's a quick photo from the EOD manual. As you can see there are two sizes 5oz Mk I and 6.5 oz Mk II.

 

RSCN1860.JPG.37ba6089ee6be4c7a3e916405a8c477b.JPG

LIKE WOW THANK YOU THIS IS GOOD   THANK YOU FOR THE INFO AND TIME TO HELP TO SHED LIGHT ON THIS  I JUST THOUGHT IT WAS A TOY ??

YOU HAVE BEEN  A BIG  BIG HELP  THANK YOU 

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bigjo

THANK YOU FOR THE INFO  YES A BIG THANK YOU , SO IT IS WW1 LIKE OTHER CHAPS I THOUGHT THAT THEY CAME IN TO USE IN WW2 .

TOP MARKS TO GUNNER  THANK YOU ANDY

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MikeMeech
1 hour ago, bigjo said:

THANK YOU FOR THE INFO  YES A BIG THANK YOU , SO IT IS WW1 LIKE OTHER CHAPS I THOUGHT THAT THEY CAME IN TO USE IN WW2 .

TOP MARKS TO GUNNER  THANK YOU ANDY

Hi

 

Other incendiary bombs were used during the war including 'Bomb - Incendiary Carcass Mark II' of 14.5 lb. and 'Bomb Petrol' Large and Small.  The 40 lb Phosphorus bomb was also used, mainly for making smoke screens during 1918 but it also could have an incendiary use (it was also tried out as a 'Target Marker' or 'Indicator' on the battlefield).  In the Middle-East another 'container' system was used to drop 60 'Smoke candles', again to form a smoke screen, the 'container' could also drop 120 'Mills bombs' as well, these were fitted to RE.8 aircraft.

 

Mike

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bigjo

EVERYTHING  IN WW1 IS SO INTERESTING .HOW IT ALL WORKED TOGETHER , AIRFORCE AND ARMY .JUST SHOWS     IT'S NOT JUST HATS AND TUNICS 

PEN AND PAPER ...ALL HAVE TO WORK AS ONE ,,  GOD BLESS THEM ALL 

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dman

The British "BABY" Incendiary was used for attacking Zeppelin sheds and other light structures   The incendiary cartridges were contained in a case and designed to break open and scatter the incendiary

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Gunner Bailey
On 17/05/2019 at 14:52, MikeMeech said:

Hi

 

The book 'Bombs Gone' by MacBean & Hogben has a drawing of both the bomb and container on page 34.  On page 37 it mentions that the Independent Force dropped about 816,000 during WW1.  The containers appear to have come in two sizes; 144 bombs in four layers and a larger one with 272 bombs.  They were meant to be carried inside an aircraft such as a HP O/400, DH.9 or DH.10.  Post War some containers appear to be fitted under the wings of DH.9a aircraft of No. 30 Sqn.  I seem to recall there being a photo of a container beneath a FE.2b or d, probably for trial purposes, if I find it I shall give a reference.

 

Mike

 

816,000 dropped in 1918 in containers of 144 or 272. That's a rough average of 3500 containers full dropped (without knowing the % per carrier). That could be as few as 30 raids by squadrons of 12 aircraft.

 

Almost a small sideshow in the aerial war. No wonder this passed most of us by.

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MikeMeech
26 minutes ago, Gunner Bailey said:

 

816,000 dropped in 1918 in containers of 144 or 272. That's a rough average of 3500 containers full dropped (without knowing the % per carrier). That could be as few as 30 raids by squadrons of 12 aircraft.

 

Almost a small sideshow in the aerial war. No wonder this passed most of us by.

Hi

The figures given for bombs dropped by the IF between 6 June and 11 November 1918 on page 37 of the mentioned source are 665 Tons of bombs on Industrial, communication and airfield targets.   About 220 Tons of this were on German airfields.  The types of bombs dropped included 11 x 1,650 lb SN, 54 x 550 lb RL/RAF, 9,902 x 112 lb RL, 21 x 50 lb RL, 266 x 40 lb Phos. Incendiary, and 3,820 x 20 lb Cooper.  Many other bombs were dropped on the enemy by Army and Corps squadrons, small in WW2 air terms and in WW1 artillery terms, however, compared in what could be dropped by aeroplanes four years earlier rather significant.

 

Mike

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Gunner Bailey
4 hours ago, MikeMeech said:

  Many other bombs were dropped on the enemy by Army and Corps squadrons, small in WW2 air terms and in WW1 artillery terms, however, compared in what could be dropped by aeroplanes four years earlier rather significant.

 

Mike

 

I agree with that Mike. The growth of the RFC was incredible, as was the development of their bombing capacity.

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