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yperman

Webley restoration

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yperman

You Tube has a channel called  Random Hands and a video called "Vintage shooting weapon - impressive restoration". It shows the restoration of a Webley Mk 4  and while I regret the  new customised grips the  techniques used to clean the weapon are fascinating.

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reese williams

Fascinating in the way a multi-car accident on the freeway is fascinating. Absolutely one of the most cringeworthy things I've seen. Bubba at the peak of his game. Not a clue as to the right way to do it or even the right tools to use.

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MikB

Disappointed.

 

I was hoping to see him make a pawl from folded catfood can and then shoot a stunning group at the end.

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Martin Feledziak
On 14/05/2019 at 08:51, yperman said:

Vintage shooting weapon

Superb work.

 

but just as an object 

 

Never imagined it would be possible to get a mirror finish on such a rusty item.

Yes the new grips spoil the finish but still great work.

 

 

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Radlad

It's been absolutely butchered!

 

Pity as it's quite a rare gun. one of a batch made in the 1930's for the Singapore police. I saw quite a lot of them at Interarms that came in a shipment from Singapore in the early 1970's.

The Singapore marking can be seen in front of  the serial no. before the gun was so abysmally treated..

 

I have also seen a photograph of a WW2 RAF policeman carrying one (actually an ex workmate) but have never seen one with British military markings.

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Waddell
1 hour ago, Radlad said:

It's been absolutely butchered!

 

Pity as it's quite a rare gun. one of a batch made in the 1930's for the Singapore police. I saw quite a lot of them at Interarms that came in a shipment from Singapore in the early 1970's.

The Singapore marking can be seen in front of  the serial no. before the gun was so abysmally treated..

 

I have also seen a photograph of a WW2 RAF policeman carrying one (actually an ex workmate) but have never seen one with British military markings.

 

Totally agree.

 

Not having had any experience with old guns, was that gun restorable to original condition?

 

Scott

Edited by Waddell
Spelling.

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MikB

I thought it looked like a Singapore Police model, too, from the safety, but I couldn't read or recognise the serial prefix, and it looked so short of markings that I wondered if it was an actual Webley or a copy. 

 

I also rather wondered about the uniformity of the rust - at just the right depth all over to allow that sort of restoration.

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kmad

I wondered if he purposefully rusted the gun with salt bath to get the powdery rust we see at the start of the video to demonstrate his "Amazing" restoration  

I concur that it is a shame to see a 80+ year old item being made to look like this

 

But I have seen discovery channel Ricks Restorations do the same thing on old coke machines and the like

 

Some people have a totally different interpretation of restoration I suppose

 

Regards

 

ken 

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reese williams

Kmad,

I think there is a different level of what is acceptable restoration depending on the collecting community standards and intended use of the items. The blow torch collectors have no problem with a brass torch being polished to a mirror shine. Something like a Coke machine that you want to use in your home would warrant stripping and repainting to a like new condition. By and large the firearm and edged weapon community prefer conservation over restoration. Sometimes you have to accept that a gun is never going to be able to be brought back to anything better than fair to poor condition. Given that there was a total loss of finish on that revolver at the start, I was ok with his use of electrolysis as a first step. That would have also been the last step. The gun should have been completely disassembled before electrolysis as it is a "line-of-sight" process. It is the only means I know of that will remove rust from pits without using an acid. After electrolysis either steel wool of a wire wheel (not the one you buy at the local hardware, there are extra fine ones used by gunsmiths for polishing) to remove the residue and then stop. Since there was no original finish left and its value as a collectible was greatly reduced, a professional rebluing could have been an option. This would have at least left the markings intact and preserved the history of the gun. At best it would be a place-holder in a collection of this type revolver until a better specimen came along.

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593jones

The end result reminded me of something that General Patton would have loved to own!  Preferably as a pair.

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MikB
2 hours ago, 593jones said:

The end result reminded me of something that General Patton would have loved to own!  Preferably as a pair.

 

I doubt it - suggest you look up his response to a comment on his supposed "pearl-handled" pistols.

(risque language alert) :innocent:

 

I can only imagine what he'd've said about plastic.

Edited by MikB

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depaor01

This response isn't as informed and educated as what's gone before, but Yuck! The whole character of it has been removed.

No likey.

Dave

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593jones
23 hours ago, MikB said:

 

I doubt it - suggest you look up his response to a comment on his supposed "pearl-handled" pistols.

(risque language alert) :innocent:

 

I can only imagine what he'd've said about plastic.

 

Vulgar man!  Do you suppose he was speaking about someone he was acquainted with?

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MikB
57 minutes ago, 593jones said:

 

Vulgar man!  Do you suppose he was speaking about someone he was acquainted with?

Does make you wonder what incident in his past might've given rise to the idea. 😉

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T8HANTS

I am suspicious of the rusting especially in view of the other items he 'restores'. 

Mix and match cross-head screws is another sign of the master craftsman, not being present.

The best thing to do with it now is to put it away in a box, before somebodies sensibilities gets hurt.

Edited by T8HANTS

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Dave66
On 17 May 2019 at 17:57, depaor01 said:

This response isn't as informed and educated as what's gone before, but Yuck! The whole character of it has been removed.

No likey.

Dave

Couldn't have put it better!

An angle grinder used on an antique gun is madness...re-blued and original grips, professionally done is a possibility, but that bright finish and grips are just insane.

Edited by Dave66

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