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MikeyH

BBC1 The Repair Shop - Norton Roll of Honour

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MikeyH

Today's programme on BBC1 at 4.30 pm, involves a Great War roll of honour from a local church.

The 4 piece wooden panel from All Saints, Norton, was damaged by water after material was stolen

from the church roof.  A friend Kim Russell takes the item in to be restored by the specialists, all the names

were in fact still visible though badly affected by damp and the wood warped.  I don't think that anything with WW1 associations

has featured previously on the programme.

 

Mike.

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Dave66
1 hour ago, MikeyH said:

Today's programme on BBC1 at 4.30 pm, involves a Great War roll of honour from a local church.

The 4 piece wooden panel from All Saints, Norton, was damaged by water after material was stolen

from the church roof.  A friend Kim Russell takes the item in to be restored by the specialists, all the names

were in fact still visible though badly affected by damp and the wood warped.  I don't think that anything with WW1 associations

has featured previously on the programme.

 

Mike.

I'll book forward to that, thanks for the tip.

Always show excellent restoration work by some very talented people.

 

Dave.

 

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keithfazzani

I will look at it. Have watched the programme from time to time. No mention of cost or who pays is ever made. Do they do it out of the kindness of their hearts?

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GWF1967
8 hours ago, Dave66 said:

I'll book forward to that, thanks for the tip.

Always show excellent restoration work by some very talented people.

 

Dave.

 

 Hmm.

 I could watch Steve the clockmaker all day - on the other hand I'd like to see less of  the "presenter" Jay Blades. He features on a few programmes where he's described as a furniture "restorer" or "designer"; all he ever seems to actually do is paint one leg of a chair with mismatched chalk paint. 

Edited by GWF1967

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Dave66
12 minutes ago, GWF1967 said:

 Hmm.

 I could watch Steve the clockmaker all day - on the other hand I'd like to see less of  the "presenter" Jay Blades. He features on a few programs where he's described as a furniture "restorer" or "designer"; all he ever seems to actually do is paint one leg of a chair with mismatched chalk paint. 

Couldn't agree more about Jay, especially on "money for nothing".

Good job they don't let him loose on the proper restorations!

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mbriscoe

The first item on today's The Repair Shop on BBC1 is the restoration of the Norton Roll of Honour.

 

Quote

 

Dominic Chinea takes on a repair of huge significance to the residents of the village of Norton in Northamptonshire: a faded and misshapen wooden memorial board that records the names of all the men of the village who served in the First World War. Sadly, the names have eroded over time and many are no longer legible. With the centenary of the 1918 armistice looming, the villagers would dearly love to see the names of the fallen restored, so that they can be honoured for years to come. Dom is apprehensive about taking on such an important and time-sensitive repair, but relishes the opportunity to get out his gold leaf kit and bring the faded names back to life.

 

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DavidOwen

A sensitive restoration expertly done.

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seaJane
1 hour ago, keithfazzani said:

No mention of cost or who pays is ever made.

BBC probably pays the restorers an appearance fee at least equivalent to their usual price for the work. Either that or it pays the Weald and Downland Museum for hire of their barn and the museum then pays the restorers.

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Dave66

Excellent restoration, I wish I had his talent and patience.

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daggers

Already alerted elsewhere.

on ‘other GW’ topic.

Edited by daggers
Extra

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mbriscoe
42 minutes ago, seaJane said:

BBC probably pays the restorers an appearance fee at least equivalent to their usual price for the work. Either that or it pays the Weald and Downland Museum for hire of their barn and the museum then pays the restorers.

 

The production company will be contracted by the BBC to make the programmes and they will hire the site and 'talent'.  The cost is probably quite reasonable compared to many other programmes.  I have seen a couple of articles about the programme, the two sisters(?) who restore teddy bears.

 

 

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derekb

Great restoration and a decent programme, unfortunately the presenter Jay Blades seems to fall into the same category as most of the antique etc experts, I wouldn’t want one with me at a Militaria Fair.

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GWF1967
3 hours ago, DavidOwen said:

A sensitive restoration expertly done.

Well said. 

 

12 hours ago, MikeyH said:

 I don't think that anything with WW1 associations

has featured previously on the programme.

 

Mike.

A previous episode showed the restoration of a broken brass sweetheart locket, given by a Great War soldier to his future wife before serving overseas.  Once repaired, the photograph of the uniformed soldier was replaced with post war photo of him in civies, which I thought a shame as the story of the locket became somewhat lost. 

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Civilian

I watched the programme yesterday, and noted that one of the names on the memorial is Lt. Col. Lord A Thynne, and am wondering if this is Algernon Thynne. He is commemorated in our church at Kilkhampton in Cornwall, as he lived at Penstowe Manor, in the village. I would be interested to know if it is him, and what his connection is with Norton in Northamptonshire.

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mbriscoe
13 minutes ago, Civilian said:

I watched the programme yesterday, and noted that one of the names on the memorial is Lt. Col. Lord A Thynne, and am wondering if this is Algernon Thynne. He is commemorated in our church at Kilkhampton in Cornwall, as he lived at Penstowe Manor, in the village. I would be interested to know if it is him, and what his connection is with Norton in Northamptonshire.

 

 

Report on his probate

 

 

Quote

Northampton Mercury - Friday 14 February 1919

Lieut-Colonel Lord Alexander George Thynne D.S,O., Wilts Yeomanry of Newton Hall, Northamptonshire and of Manchester Square, London, W. M.P. for Bath

 

Quote

Test testator left "250 each to the executors and all his estates in Northamptonshire .....

 

 

So sounds as if he might have lived in the area and had land there

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Civilian

Thank you all for the information. I will have to do a bit of research on Alexander Thynne. 

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tootrock

I notice that all the burials in Row L in the plot in Bethune Town Cemetery where Alexander George Thynne lies are of Officers. Row K is the same. Is this segregation by rank a normal practice?

Martin

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rolt968
10 hours ago, mbriscoe said:

Capture.JPG.c04a2d8dd89453d2bc68398cfa70e95a.JPG

There is a section on Norton Hall and Lord Alexander George Thynne in the Nothamptonshire chapter in The Aristocracy and the Great War (Gerald Gliddon).

I'm not sure why the newspaper thought he was the Hon Alexander...… He was the third son of the 4th Marquess of Bath which would make him Lord Alexander.... (Honourables are younger sons of Earls, Viscounts and Barons). Unfortunately Gerald Gliddon gets it wrong the other way a couple of times and calls him "Lord Thynne".

 

Lord Alexander George Thynne was killed in action on 14 September 1918 near Bethune (Gliddon)

 

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chaz

Thynne, and Marquis of Bath mentioned... Tie up with Longleat House and park?

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rolt968
18 hours ago, chaz said:

Thynne, and Marquis of Bath mentioned... Tie up with Longleat House and park?

Yes indeed.

There is actually more about Alexander George Thynne in the bit on Longleat in the Wiltshire chapter than there is in the Norton Hall section.

RM

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