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Remembered Today:

Nutting

1915 P1907 bayonet

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Dave66

Does the locket have exposed or flush rivets, if flush it would indicate an earlier piece...shame we can't see the scabbard date, but not uncommon.

Always fancied trawling round the German fortifications on the Channel Islands, militaria hunting as well...I'd better talk to the boss and put it on the listūüėÄ.

 

Dave.

 

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Nutting
12 minutes ago, Dave66 said:

Does the locket have exposed or flush rivets, if flush it would indicate an earlier piece...shame we can't see the scabbard date, but not uncommon.

Always fancied trawling round the German fortifications on the Channel Islands, militaria hunting as well...I'd better talk to the boss and put it on the listūüėÄ.

 

Dave.

 

Dave,  Flush.  The locket is somewhat corroded, but no exposed rivet heads.  If you plan to visit, let me know.  Beer is available :)  N.

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Dave66
23 minutes ago, Nutting said:

Dave,  Flush.  The locket is somewhat corroded, but no exposed rivet heads.  If you plan to visit, let me know.  Beer is available :)  N.

ūüĎć

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Nutting
19 hours ago, JMB1943 said:

 

I’m very surprised that there are at least 20 kukris in the whole of the Channel Islands, never mind that you alone have 20 !!

 

Regards,

JMB

 

A table full of kukris!  The closest to the camera is 1890-1900.  Nigel

IMG_1912.JPG

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JMB1943

Nigel,

 

That display is both mouth- and eye-watering, considering the reputation of the Gurkhas.

Especially the decorated scabbard; is that silver?

I was in an antique store late yesterday afternoon just before closing. There was a kukri, labeled as WW2, with dull grey blade and 

dark brown hilt, but my interest is in the Great War so I left it there.

No markings visible to me.

Regarding GW-period British Army issue, where were they made?

Are they ever marked as the typical P.07 bayonet?

The same questions for the scabbards.

Your display appears to show at least two different blade shapes; are all/ any of these of the GW period?

 

Regards,

JMB

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Nutting

The kukri with the pierced silver decoration on the scabbard is called a kothimora.  They are often used for presentation purposes (personally I don't like them, but don't tell anyone ;) ).

Antique shops, auction houses, etc. tend to label any kukri as 'WW2'.  If it has a brass bolster or brass rings on the handle, it 99% isn't a military kukri.  If it has INDIA marked on the blade using a hammer & punch, it 100% isn't military kukri.  Dark brown handle would be either wood or buffalo horn.

GW-period military kukris would have been made by contractors in India (Pensioner, Boota Singh, etc.) or by regimental armourers/kukri-makers.  Current-era issue kukris (the Mk.5) are made in Nepal.

GW-period kukris will often have unit and individual service numbers on the spine.  Scabbards may also be marked.  Kukris from the pre-GW period Nepalese Army may have unit designations in Nepali script.  

Older kukris ( up to mid-20th C) tend to have a smoothly rounded spine, such as the first one in the photo;  from mid-20th C onwards, the 'dog-leg' bend in the spine appears.

I had the pleasure of showing this collection to a group of serving Gurkhas.  "If the manure hit the air conditioning" I asked, "which of these kukris would you want to be holding?".  Every one of them pointed to the big, heavy Victorian era kukri and said "That one!".

I have several kukri-related posts at www.utting.org/site (click on Kukris in the heading).

 

N.

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trajan

It certainly is a very interesting and nice looking display there! And thanks for the primer on how to spot a WW1 or earlier example.

Edited by trajan

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Dave66

Very brave those Gurkhas, a few years ago I brought a couple of books, the V.C. and the G.C. registers. Inside it was a ton of paperwork as the previous owner was a member of the G.C. association, amongst it was 6 autographs of V.C. winners...4 Gurkha. When I read through each V.C. citation it just went to show how fearless and selfless they were.

 

Very impressive collection of kukri's there Nigel....many thanks for sharing them, and the identification guide, I'm sure there will be an equally impressive bayonet collection alongside fairly soon.

 

Dave.

Edited by Dave66

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