Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
meekumslr

Help identifying stretcher type

Recommended Posts

meekumslr

Hi all,

I have a stretcher which has retracting (sliding) handles and appears WW1.

There is one on the side of the MkIV horse drawn ambulance in the museum of army medicine and the only couple of pictures online suggest late Victorian up to WW1.

There is little information on this type of stretcher and I wondered if anyone’s had any info, particularly the reason why the handles slid into the frame?

Many thanks, Neil.

 

 

7A883F00-FE8D-4425-B18E-6002492B4D74.jpeg

 

 

AEB1681A-7F70-4B32-B73B-D064A51DC9FE.jpeg

Edited by meekumslr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meekumslr

Hello all,

since posting this, I believe I have discovered the reason for the sliding handles.

These stretchers are ‘John Furley’ stretchers, WW1 St Johns Ambulance.

John Furley being one of St Johns Ambulance founders.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TEW

Not that I knew much about stretchers but I have looked through 'Medical Services; General History' and some of 'British Journal of Nursing'.

 

Medical Services Vol IV has a good section of stretcher types and development. They list the Roger's,
Meek, Grant, Neil Robertson, Willis, Colt, Graves, Langley-Jones, Welsh, Butler, Johnstone-Stirling. Aubrey's, Goodacre, Sussex yoke and Withers stretchers. Only the latter has collapsible or foldaway handles.

 

Following the offical sanction of the Roger's type in May 1915 so many new designs were being submitted for testing that the DMS 1st Army tried to stem the flow.

 

Cavalry Divisions had their own variations based on being able to stow the stretchers away while on the move, numerous designs there but nothing that sounds like yours.

 

Other units from field ambulances, MACs, ATs etc all tried their own variations, many one-offs were probably in use.

 

Longmore's Ambulance Transport 1869 apparently describes trench stretchers of earlier wars.

 

The standard trench stretcher had to fit onto standard stretcher frames mounted on ambulance wagons, cars etc. Standard stretcher was also considered too long for general use in trenches hence the Roger's design.

 

Not sure what length your stretcher is with handles in out position but sliding handles won't help when navigating trenches, could even make things worse. If it's any longer than standard type even less likley to be of front line use.

 

You say you've possibly IDd it as a Furley Stretcher. I've had a hunt around and the images of Furley Stretchers I can find don't show retractible handles.

 

I did find that Ambulance Trains Nos. 14-17 were equipped with Furley Cots which must be a different thing. No. 11 AT was also known as BRC AT11 and was also equipped with Furley Cots and I have a small list of VADs who served on AT11.

 

Is the Museum of Army Medicine, Aldershot the one proposed by Furley in 1916?

 

Going back to your original query could it be a civilian BRC / St John's stretcher? Does it have broad arrow?

TEW

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
meekumslr

Tew,

Thanks for the reply and information.

I only guess at Furley as I found one online with sliding handles.

I can’t find markings on the stretcher at all.

The canvas has the pillow grommets in.

It may well be civilian as time has been taken to edge it in a leather strip.

The age looks WW1.

I may email the museum to try and get further info.

Neil.

Edited by meekumslr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...