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fritz

Wounded in the hands of their enemies

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fritz


Had wounded prisoners the same chance of a quick treatment? Or were the own guys first cared and the prisoners were in the last in line?

Britischer Verbandsplatz.jpg

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Rob B

Thats very subjective, it all depends on who was doing the triage and what experiences they had. I am sure if the nurse/doctor had lost relatives and friends then its likely to influence their decision - and that would be the same for all nations.

My great Aunt was the Assistant Matron in 3 (CCS) Casualty Clearing Station when it was overrun by the Germans in March 1918, she had been at the front since 1914 and was one of the first 100 nurses over the channel. I remember her being very complimentary of the German unit and officers who helped her on her way with the wounded during the withdrawal.

 

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MaxD

Geht darauf an!!

 

Medical men in all countries would be trained to treat first those needing treatment first whether they were enemy or friend.  However, the medics were also human and as Rob B says, would react in  different ways.  I don't think there can be a rule that governs all situations.

 

Max

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SiegeGunner

German prisoners repatriated on medical grounds were debriefed on return and told a wide variety of stories.  As Max says, 'It all depends'. 

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Michael Thomson

I've read accounts of British stretcherbearers transporting German wounded despite themselves being in danger from shellfire during the Somme Offensive. 

 

The level of ethics and integrity of combat medics is inspiring.

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fritz

Thanks for all your comments. - I agree, human interaction with wounded was mostly self-evident as these pictures show. But sometimes there were orders from above that governed such matters.

first-world-war-ww1-one-pictures-photos-images-amazing-rare-incredible-german-soldiers-012[1].jpg

Versorgung eines deutschen Gefangenen in einem englischen Verbandsplatz.jpg

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Sapper D.

Having read a fair few books on this matter, concerning various wars/battles etc. I would say that the treatment of wounded PRISONERS depended hugely on how the battle/war was going and the PR of the enemy.

IE: was he Waffen SS? - off with his head, sort of thing.

But (see Market-Garden), not always true….

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Black Maria

In the book 'Combed Out' there is an interesting chapter about the author's experiences as an orderly in a busy C.C.S during an offensive ( 3rd Ypres? )

The Germans were treated after the British , the surgeon telling one badly wounded prisoner that he would be better treated than the English wounded

were in Germany . Half way through their gruesome work of amputation  one surgeon was growing bored so the anaesthetist suggested they swop over

jobs and he had a go at the surgery , so both operating tables switched over and the two anaesthetists performed one operation each.

 

I have read many memoirs where wounded British prisoners received scant medical attention , especially those it seems taken in the German offensives

of 1914 and 1918 . In the former it seemed mainly out of spite and the latter because medical supplies were in short supply because of the blockade.

 

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BullerTurner

The problem with questions like this one, is they tend to be answered with reference to anecdote and y case histories rather than by General or statistical analysis; for the simple reason one exists and the other data set does not.  Or at least is still to be thoroughly researched, analysed and a conclusion, robust to critique, reached.

 

ironically if such analysis had been concluded, it's usually attacked by anecdotes and one of those debates ensues!

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