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Remembered Today:

Cpl Coleman

My Grandad's Pip, Squeak & Wilfred

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Cpl Coleman

I was cleaning out my late brother's attic a couple of weeks ago and came across our granddad's (Thomas Coleman 45826 RGA 16 Siege Battery) WW1 trio in a Princess Mary tin in one of our parent's old trunks! I had never seen the medals before and had only heard family stories about them. They're a little on the dirty side... What's the best way to gently clean them?

 

 

IMG_20181213_212606570_HDR.jpg

Grandfather Thomas Coleman in Uniform Circa 1915 (2).jpg

Edited by Cpl Coleman

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daggers

Alfred???

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Cpl Coleman

 Whoops! ... Wilfred. Thanks daggers

Edited by Cpl Coleman

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ForeignGong

Great find and in the Christmas tin.

His MIC

Cole.JPG

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chaz

with regards to cleaning, thats 100 years of patina on them, personally....I would leave as they are.

other opinions are available...

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PhilB

Perhaps soap and water and a toothbrush. Patina is desirable but not muck!

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trench whistle

Personally I'd leave them as they are, they have taken nearly 100 years to look like that and they have a pleasing overall tone which suits the aged ribbons. I particularly like the blue black patina BWM get when they haven't been touched for decades . Cleaning them back to bright shiny metal will make them look like replicas undoing a hundred years of gentle ageing in seconds.

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Medaler

If you want them clean I would consider taking them to a Jeweller who has an unltrasonic cleaner. It shouldn't cost a fortune, and the process is not abrasive. If you drop me a PM, I believe I know a highly reputable medal dealer who may be able to offer this service.

 

A delightful find - I'm thrilled for you!

 

Mike

Edited by Medaler

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Jim Strawbridge

I concur. Leave them as they are unless there is dirt and grime on them. Then soapy, warm water and a soft-headed toothbrush. The Victory Medal currently has original lustre and this could be lost if overly cleaned. The patina on the BWM is a natural condition through aging and reaction with the air (like rust but not metal destroying). As a collector I would prefer my BWMs to be like this rather than bright and shiny. They do not need to be bright and shiny - the parade ground requirement was over 100 years ago.

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58 Div Mule

I'd leave them alone. 100 years of history......

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Dragoon

I'm really pleased for you, what a fantastic find!

 

Chris

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