Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
Keith_history_buff

The genesis of the "woolly pully"?

Recommended Posts

Keith_history_buff

During WW1, jerseys with patches on the shoulders, and plain jerseys, were being worn by the Egyptian Army. Similar garments were being worn by some African units too. 

Does anyone know how this developed into the woolly pully?

 

IWM Q 15597
January 1917, buglers of the Nigeria Regiment

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205087895

 

IWM Catalogue number Q 92407

2nd Battalion, King's African Rifles

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/205335801

 

Sudanese troops at the Nile in 1917
https://www.firstworldwar.com/photos/graphics/gw_niletroops_01.jpg

 

Sergeant of the 9th Sudanese Battalion
(Sourced from The Wonder Book of Soldiers af Harry Golding (ed.), Ward, Lock & Co., London, c. 1940 via an article by Per Finsted.)
 

East Africa Police, date unknown
 

 

Sudanese_9thBn.JPG

Kenya.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keith_history_buff

Image sourced from BBC website, believed to be taken 1943-4 in the Aegean

The best images of the WW2 woolly pully are probably in the 1955 film "The Cockleshell Heroes"

WoollyPullyBBC.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MBrockway

Much loved by the Commandos in WW2 - see here for some detail on the various patterns:

http://forum.commandoveterans.org/cdoForum/posts/list/15/5076.page#19085

 

I still wear mine from the 1970s!  Bit frayed round the cuffs now, but still as warm and comfy as ever.  Shirt, Hairy, however only gets worn as gardening/building scruff kit :thumbsup:

 

 

Edited by MBrockway

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scalyback

I'm sure I have seen trench pictures with the men wearing woolly jumpers. Not a big leap for a man to add a patch on the wear points. 

Unofficial dress to make a squaddie comfy is normally ahead of the curve. Buffalo shirts not issued until 2010(ish) I was wearing one as a snot cadet in 95! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Scalyback

The cardigan he is wearing. Very close.

somme1-e1341132433534.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keith_history_buff
21 minutes ago, MBrockway said:

Much loved by the Commandos in WW2 - see here for some detail on the various patterns:

http://forum.commandoveterans.org/cdoForum/posts/list/15/5076.page#19085

 

I still wear mine from the 1970s!  Bit frayed round the cuffs now, but still as warm and comfy as ever.  Shirt, Hairy, however only gets worn as gardening/building scruff kit :thumbsup:

 

 

 

Thanks for the link, very interesting! So, it was not until the third pattern that the patches on the shoulder were added.

I had recently seen an image on a different site, and was surprised to see the drawstring around the neck. Given that it was for mountain warfare, it now makes more sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Keith_history_buff

There's a pic of a neat looking cardie on this thread - certainly more presentable than the example that Albert Steptoe wore!
https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/222161-the-issued-cardigan/?tab=comments#comment-2671191

It's a different time period, but there's an interesting image of a section of the East Surreys on that wikipedia page, taken 16 December 1943. They are wearing pullovers and field service caps, and look so different to the perceived image of the Tommy. The pullover in that instance is preferred as an alternative to the battledress blouse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
keithmroberts

Can we avoid turning this into a Skindles thread please.

 

Keith

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...