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jimmytx3

Royal Navy service record,

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jimmytx3

Hi, would anyone able to tell me more info regarding Patrick Kelly's service, he signed on for twelve years but completed eight years, at the end of his service it says DSQ, I originally thought it was DS2, but have since found out it stands for Discharged to Sick Quarters, would this have been a serious career ending injury, or light duties? any other info would really be appreciated.

Bye for now Jimmy

https://postimg.cc/56jq2WVS

 

Edited by jimmytx3
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RaySearching

Did he also serve in The Great war ?

 

 

Ray

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seaJane

It's losing definition when I zoom in but I think he was discharged (with Excellent character report?) and a pension, to judge by the notes at the foot of the form. Can't make out what the squiggle to the right of DSQ is.

 

As for what happened next, he may have got better and signed up again in another service, but you'd have to connect records to prove that.

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Neil 2242

He was serving on HMS Barfleur on the China station.

Look up Boxer Rebellion and storming of the Taku Forts.

Landing parties from Barfleur involved. So he would have received the China 1900 medal, with or without Taku Forts clasps defending on his personal involvement

 

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horatio2

After DSQ I think it records "Invd [= invalided] 7/9/05"

Edited by horatio2

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jimmytx3

Hi all, thank you, he was a member of my wife's family, Horatio, it does look like 'Invd' that would fit with his service being cut short, he is listed in 1911 census as back in Liverpool, living with his mother Mary Kelly, so it must have been quite a serious injury. 
Is there anywhere I could look for navy hospital records to find out about his injury or illness, thanks for all the reply's.
Bye for now Jimmy
ps does it have a trade or rank?  

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horatio2
40 minutes ago, jimmytx3 said:

so it must have been quite a serious injury

Not necessarily an injury. It may have been an illness (e.g. heart disease). No records survive which give details.

He joined as a boy and was an able seaman (AB) on discharge.

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jimmytx3

Cheers, its amazing looking into family trees, thanks for your help :thumbsup:

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jimmytx3

Hi, he did indeed get a medal, I wonder if he ended up in the cells because of the newspaper article?


 

 

hms barfleur 1901 medal.JPG

cells.JPG

hms barfleur 1901.JPG

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Neil 2242

Seemed most likely he had the medal, it was just a case of which clasp if any.

Plenty of reading to do on the Relief of Pekin then.

 

Just to bring a Great War angle to it, one of Barfleur's officers at the time was Commander David Beatty, the later Admiral of the Fleet.

Plus on that medal roll image above, another was a younger brother of Admiral Jellicoe if I'm not mistaken.

Edited by Neil 2242

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horatio2

His 14 days in cells was 8-21 August 1900, which means that the incident in BARFLEUR would have occurred in early August 1900 if his punishment was for that event. Five months seems a long delay before the newspaper report.

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jimmytx3
6 hours ago, Neil 2242 said:

Seemed most likely he had the medal, it was just a case of which clasp if any.

Plenty of reading to do on the Relief of Pekin then.

 

Just to bring a Great War angle to it, one of Barfleur's officers at the time was Commander David Beatty, the later Admiral of the Fleet.

Plus on that medal roll image above, another was a younger brother of Admiral Jellicoe if I'm not mistaken.

Hi Neil, this has opened a whole new episode in my wife's family history, and I will be reading up on it, Patrick Kelly did get awarded the bar to his medal, all the men on this list got the Relief of Pekin bar. 

hms barfleur 1901 medal.JPG

Edited by jimmytx3

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jimmytx3

The mutiny seems to be a storm in a tea cup.

 

THE MUTINY ON H. M.S. BARFLEUR.

A Marine's Version. i;

It will be remembered that some few weeks ago a cable message was published regarding a mutiny on H.M.S. Barfleur at Hong Kong. Among the passengers in the R.M.S. Oroya, which has just, reached Australia, was a marine who was on board at the time of the alleged mutiny, and who is proceeding to Victoria on a visit to his parents. He related to a reporter of the Perth Morning Herald several details of the occurrence. The whole affair arose out of a trivial incident. A dinner was being given to a number of the men in the Hong Kong Hotel by one of the crew from the vessel who had been serving in South Africa, and who had accumulated some money while there in various ways. Permission was not asked, and therein lay the whole cause of the trouble. During the progress of the dinner one of the bluejackets was overcome with the heat, and, while leaving the dining room, encountered the Admiral. That official at once demanded who was giving the dinner, but the man said he did not know. Later on an inquiry was held on board the ship, but no one would admit who was the host. The Admiral at this - became somewhat annoyed, and curtailed the men's leave, with the result that the sailors and marines attached to the warship were not allowed general leave at Christmas. Much dissatisfaction was caused, and when the order was given to dress the ship for the festive season the ship's crew to a man refused to obey the orders. They were then peremptorily ordered' by the Admiral himself to carry out the instructions, and ran up an "apology" for decorations in the shape of a few evergreens. The men were discontented, and their black looks and continual grumbling so incensed the commander that he ordered their Christmas delicacies to be thrown over the side. The men retaliated by stripping the guns of their sights and throwing them overboard, the officer’s bell quickly following. A court of inquiry was held on board on January 3rd, the court being composed of Captain G. A. Callaghan, of H.M.S. Endymion, and Commanders F. O. A. Ogilvy, of HM.S. Terrible, and Creswell J. Byres, of H.M.S. Undaunted. The result of the inquiry was in favour of the men, who were at once granted their usual privileges.' That settled the difficulty, and “peace and goodwill" reigned on board.

hms barfleur 1901 2a.JPG

hms barfleur 1901 2b.JPG

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jimmytx3

The mutiny seems to be a storm in a tea cup.

 

THE MUTINY ON H. M.S. BARFLEUR.

A Marine's Version. i;

It will be remembered that some few weeks ago a cable message was published regarding a mutiny on H.M.S. Barfleur at Hong Kong. Among the passengers in the R.M.S. Oroya, which has just, reached Australia, was a marine who was on board at the time of the alleged mutiny, and who is proceeding to Victoria on a visit to his parents. He related to a reporter of the Perth Morning Herald several details of the occurrence. The whole affair arose out of a trivial incident. A dinner was being given to a number of the men in the Hong Kong Hotel by one of the crew from the vessel who had been serving in South Africa, and who had accumulated some money while there in various ways. Permission was not asked, and therein lay the whole cause of the trouble. During the progress of the dinner one of the bluejackets was overcome with the heat, and, while leaving the dining room, encountered the Admiral. That official at once demanded who was giving the dinner, but the man said he did not know. Later on an inquiry was held on board the ship, but no one would admit who was the host. The Admiral at this - became somewhat annoyed, and curtailed the men's leave, with the result that the sailors and marines attached to the warship were not allowed general leave at Christmas. Much dissatisfaction was caused, and when the order was given to dress the ship for the festive season the ship's crew to a man refused to obey the orders. They were then peremptorily ordered' by the Admiral himself to carry out the instructions, and ran up an "apology" for decorations in the shape of a few evergreens. The men were discontented, and their black looks and continual grumbling so incensed the commander that he ordered their Christmas delicacies to be thrown over the side. The men retaliated by stripping the guns of their sights and throwing them overboard, the officer’s bell quickly following. A court of inquiry was held on board on January 3rd, the court being composed of Captain G. A. Callaghan, of H.M.S. Endymion, and Commanders F. O. A. Ogilvy, of HM.S. Terrible, and Creswell J. Byres, of H.M.S. Undaunted. The result of the inquiry was in favour of the men, who were at once granted their usual privileges.' That settled the difficulty, and “peace and goodwill" reigned on board.

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