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HERITAGE PLUS

Royal Irish Constabulary Uniform and Medal

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HERITAGE PLUS

Assistance needed on identification of this photo please.

 

The subject of the photo is believed to be Hubert/Herbert/Bertie M. Higgins from Skeen.

 

Is he wearing RIC uniform with a Royal Visit to Ireland Medal?

 

Thanks in advance

 

Dave

Herbert (Bertie) Higgins.jpg

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corisande

A "Herbert M Higgins" joined RIC on 9 Sep 1902. He was a Protestant farmer from Co Sligo

He resigned 6 Jan 1908 because of "severity of duty"

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corisande

If it were  him, then it presumably would be "Skreen" rather than "Skeen" to be in Sligo

 

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HERITAGE PLUS

Thanks Corisande.

 

Yes my typo should read  Skreen.

 

Dave

 

 

Edited by HERITAGE PLUS

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corisande

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visit_to_Ireland_Medal_1903

 

He was in RIC at the correct date for that medal

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corisande

And he seems to have been in Coldstream Guards before that

 

Name: Hubert Michael Higgins
Enlistment Age: 18
Birth Date: abt 1879
Birth Place: Skiern Sligo
Enlistment Year: 1897
Regiment: Coldstream Guards
Regimental Number: 2909
Attestation Paper: Yes

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corisande

And a sad end

higgins.jpg.c43eb73d8cb050f6ffe2d6766a93e2a7.jpg

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HERITAGE PLUS

Many Many thanks for all your help.

 

Dave

 

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Lorraine Lang
On 9/30/2018 at 10:10 PM, HERITAGE PLUS said:

Many Many thanks for all your help.

 

Dave

 

Hi Dave,

Hubert Michael Higgins was my great grandfathers brother, the story is that he was gassed in the war and when he came home he was just not the same.  Family folklore says that the Land Commission took his farm from him and put him into a hospital as he was "mentally affected".  My great grandfather took him out to live with him where he went down to his bedroom and shot himself after he lost the farm.  At present we can not find any proof that he did in fact serve in the war.

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corisande

Lorraine

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

I cannot see any record of him serving

 

I think that given he shot himself in 1918, that it is unlikely that the Land Commission would have confiscated his farm by then

 

You have two obvious avenues to research

 

1. Irish newspaper records - click for them - it is quite expensive, but you can  probably get a free link from you local library. His suicide should be reported, plus any eviction.

 

2. Land Commission records will give any history for the farm

 

Unless you know what regiment he served with, I think it unlikely that you can get him that way

Edited by corisande

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HERITAGE PLUS

Hi Lorraine

 

Welcome to the Forum and Thanks for your response.

 

Have you been on touch with Simone Hickey?

 

Dave

 

Thanks again Corisande

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Lorraine Lang
8 hours ago, corisande said:

Lorraine

 

Welcome to the forum.

 

I cannot see any record of him serving

 

I think that given he shot himself in 1918, that it is unlikely that the Land Commission would have confiscated his farm by then

 

You have two obvious avenues to research

 

1. Irish newspaper records - click for them - it is quite expensive, but you can  probably get a free link from you local library. His suicide should be reported, plus any eviction.

 

2. Land Commission records will give any history for the farm

 

Unless you know what regiment he served with, I think it unlikely that you can get him that way

Thank you, that is just the story that was told down through the family, perhaps they thought when he was in uniform that he was in the war or that the fact the he was in the Coldstream Guards and that they were the oldest continuously serving regiment in the British Army.

 

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Lorraine Lang
5 hours ago, HERITAGE PLUS said:

Hi Lorraine

 

Welcome to the Forum and Thanks for your response.

 

Have you been on touch with Simone Hickey?

 

Dave

 

Thanks again Corisande

 

5 hours ago, HERITAGE PLUS said:

Hi Lorraine

 

Welcome to the Forum and Thanks for your response.

 

Have you been on touch with Simone Hickey?

 

Dave

 

Thanks again Corisande

Yes, it was Simone that showed me that he may not have served,

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HERITAGE PLUS

Lorraine

 

Thats great- Simone is doing a great job - and I am helping her.

 

Dave

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Peter Mc

Hubert Michael Higgins 60559 was stationed in Bunbeg, Dungloe District, Donegal. I suspect he was one of a number of men selected for Guard of Honour duties in Londonderry for the occasion of the King's Visit in 1903, which would tie in with the photograph.  He was awarded a certificate of the St John Ambulance Association for training completed as a recruit at the Phoenix Park Depot in July 1902, prior to being allocated to Donegal. He also received a Favourabke Record for good police duty.

He had attested for service in September 1899 (preference the R. Irish Fusiliers) but was discharged the same month, I think he had lied about his age.  That is a nice photo.

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