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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

German East African Coins


KONDOA
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Andy (andigger) has just noticed my avatar is of a coin he also has in his possession. My particular one came back from GEA with GF in his pocket along with a dodgy Kruger shilling.

Some of these coins were made in Morogoro on the orders of Von Lettow Vorbeck, the miltary commander, in order to overcome the shortage of coinage and cash to maintain his forces.

My particular one is of copper alloy as I believe Andigger's is. However some were made from gunmetal from the Konigsberg. How many more are there out in the forum members grubby hands???

Roop

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It also looks like your might be mistruck, at least it appears that way on the reverse side.

Also curious are there any of the 20 Heller coins out there from a date other than 1916?

Andy

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Andy,

The mis-strike is how you tell the Morogoro minted coins. There was only one die set (1916 believe it or not) which was used by a blacksmith (swartzsmut?? :D ) to make these coins. Other dates exist in more salubrious metals.

Roop

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Thanks for that Neil, obviously there were more faces than I had been led to believe and made in Tobora not Morogoro.

Other than that a wholly factual summary on my part <_<

Roop

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"...the German Cruiser the SMS Konigsberg that was earlier scuttled in the Rufiji river delta after being sunk by the Allies."

Maybe this is the ship wreck that my coin came from, and its worth something after all! :D

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Hi Andy,

I seem to recall a mention, possibly in Strachen's Volume I, of Germany sending some coins to East Africa to alleviate the 'hard' money shortage. The natives were not enthusiastic about accepting script. I will try to remember to check when I get home tonight.

Next time you are in Barnes & Noble check in the collectable section for Krause's guide to Twentieth Century World Coins. That should give you an idea of value.

Take care,

Neil

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Thanks Neil... Actually Drake and I were PMing before starting the thread. I got my coin from a friend, who paid a bit for it (just a bit) since she new I had an interest in WWI.

I took it to a coin show where it was valued at $1-2 dollars (if that). Since there is some sea water damage, I humour myself that it is actually a coin that was found in a shipwreck of a ship that was sunk trying to run the blockade.

Perhaps far fetched, but at least its a thought....

Andy

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Hi Andy,

I'll never understand coins a 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter that never circulated is worth 10,000 times more than your coin.

But if your coin could talk......

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Good thread.....

I've attached a scan out of my 1996 Krause World coins book. Looks like Roop's coin is Obv A, Rev A, so the more common(?).

Neil, as to your comment that you don't understand coins and their value, it's supply and demand. While I agree with you that the 20 Heller has a lot more historical signifigance, the simple fact is that U.S. coin collectors drive the market and there are thousands collecting the S.L. Quarters, while no one cares about the 20 Heller. In fact I'm appalled at the lack of knowledge (generally) in the US about the Great War. I graduated from High School 22 years ago (ouch!) and I was taught nothing about TGW other than it's chronilogical order in US history, and only now after discovering 5 relations that fought have I taken an interest.

Anyway, I got off topic........ :huh:

Cheers,

JAY

post-3-1106115517.jpg

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Jay... to follow your though, what do you know about Great War era coins? As a side hobby I have collected coins from some of the major European combatant nations. Of course some of the coins are 'worthless' in a collectors eye... $1.50 or less for some. Of course others are worth much more. I was just curious how much you know about the market and what you collect.

Andy

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Hi Jay,

Thank you for the posting and you are absolutely right regarding coin prices particularly with US issues.

If it makes you feel any better (worse?) I graduated High School 17 years ago and my historical education was rather poor as well. So not much changed in 5 years! I did benefit from an excellent class which covered the Revolution,Constitution and early Federal Period outside of that not much to say.

Andy,

you may want to try:

http://forums.collectors.com/categories.cfm?catid=6

Check out Coin World Magazine they are more world coin foucused than most other US coin publications:

http://www.coinworld.com/

I'm not a member of this forum but I lurk there quite a bit.

As a medal collector, it's not really a huge stretch to get into coins. Prices and grade sensitivity have kept me out of US coins for the most part. I have been buying Polish/Lithuanian Medieval and Renaissance coins as they can be had pretty cheaply.

My Hobby budget is about to disappear so I can esaily see myself picking up some XF/F world and US coins so I can continue to collect something other than dust!

Take care,

Neil

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Andy,

I do collect coins, but only US coins (so far). I have most of my experience with Lincoln & Indian Cents, but have a good general knowledge of all US issue coins.

I mostly peddle on ebay and use the profits to support my own collecting habbit !!

I do have that Krause book of World Coins and would be glad to answer any questions you have about specific coins.

One word of caution as to the Coin World link Neil sent you. The prices listed there are RETAIL prices and you will find that most dealers will offer you only 25-50% of that figure to buy your coins (if that!), because as I've already mentioned earlier in this thread, nobody collects foreign coins, at least to the extent of the US collectors, so there is very little market for these coins.

One thing I have learned while collecting coins is, buy what you enjoy and do it for fun !! So, beauty and value are really in the eye of the beholder. If you try to collect with the idea of making a profit, 9 times out of 10 you will get bit in the ass.

Again, any specific questions are welcome. An emailed picture and country of origin is a must.

Cheers,

JAY

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I should have thought of doing this earlier, but I am still getting used to the novelty of having a digital camera. Here are some pics of my priceless ( :rolleyes: )coin. Andy

post-3-1106270243.jpg

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