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Remembered Today:

1st Battalion Yorks & Lancs


Guest Steve Dalton
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Guest Steve Dalton

Hi all,

I was wonderfing if anyone has any information at all on this units part in the battle Yprea. My grandfather was wounded during this battle, but would never talk of it to anyone. Any info at all would be greatfully recieved,

Many thanks,

Steve

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Hi Steve

Do you know which Ypres battle this was? Or which year?

FWIIW, I don't see any mention of 1/Yorks and Lancs in the 1917 Third Battle of Ypres.

Robert

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Guest Steve Dalton

I beleave it was the second battle, but know nothing about it. I've tried the regimental museum in Rotherham but have had no luck.

Thanks,

Steve

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Yes, there are several mentions of 1/Yorks and Lancs in the Battleground Europe series on St Julien (ISBN 0 85052 839 9)

When the gas attack was launched and the British/Canadian flank was exposed, 1/Y&L were ordered forward to St Jean from west of Ypres. It took them till next morning to get there. They were then placed at the disposal of the Canadians and were put into reserve. On 23rd April, they took part in an attack in the afternoon. 'Such was the ground - open, with little cover and sloping up towards the enemy lines - that the attack had little chance of success. The soldiers, as they rose from the ground, presented wonderful targets to the German rifles and machine-guns. The enemy immediately opened up intense fire and few got within 200 yards of the enemy positions. There was some hand-to-hand fighting in the farms and cottages used by the Germans as advanced positions but by 7 pm all fighting had stopped.

The 1/York and Lancaster lost its commanding officer, Lt Col A.G. Burt killed, 13 officers and 411 other ranks.'

Robert

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Aside from Long, Long Trail main sight I would check out both

www.greatwar.co.uk/ and www.firstworldwar.com

Although they might not be specific to your topic they do have references included. Good luck. Andy

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Hello Steve,

Like you, my grandfather was 1st York and Lancs and he too was wounded at Ypres in 1915. He was a pre-war regular soldier.

The best account that I can find is the book "Magnificent But Not War" by John Dixon.

As well as the 400 or so casualties already mentioned, when the batallian defended at Frezenburg they entered with a strength of 950 and exited with 93 men uninjured, the most senior being a sargeant.

The book also states that the total number killed from the batallian in the entire battle was just under 300. Goven that something like 1300 men were shelled, machine gunned and gassed I would say that this ia a remarkable effort on the part of the medical corps.

What happened to your grandfather. Mine was sent home and transferred to the Army Service Corps. He spent some time convalescing in Sunderland where he met my grandmother and stayed.

Good luck with your searching,

John Harper

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