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LEUZEWOOD

Time taken for burial after death?

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LEUZEWOOD

I suspect I'm about to answer my own question here, but does anybody have any records demonstrating the general time it would have taken for a man to have been buried after death at a base hospital, for example, Etaples, Camiers etc. I would imagine that given the conditions and lack of refrigeration etc, that this would have been a pretty swift procedure?

 

Many Thanks, Tom.

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ss002d6252
5 minutes ago, LEUZEWOOD said:

I suspect I'm about to answer my own question here, but does anybody have any records demonstrating the general time it would have taken for a man to have been buried after death at a base hospital, for example, Etaples, Camiers etc. I would imagine that given the conditions and lack of refrigeration etc, that this would have been a pretty swift procedure?

 

Many Thanks, Tom.

I'd be surprised if it was more than 48 hours.


Craig

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LEUZEWOOD

Yes, thank you Craig, I would imagine no longer. Perhaps a stupid question in hindsight!

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ss002d6252
3 minutes ago, LEUZEWOOD said:

Yes, thank you Craig, I would imagine no longer. Perhaps a stupid question in hindsight!

 

Never a stupid question.

 

I'm sure someone has AO1234 - Bodies, Human. Burial, timing of.

 

Craig

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LEUZEWOOD

There was a sentimental purpose to the question actually. My great grandfather died 102 years and two days ago at No. 4 General Hospital in Camiers, and I guess I'd always mulled over when and how his funeral (of sorts) at Etaples took place.

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ss002d6252
1 minute ago, LEUZEWOOD said:

There was a sentimental purpose to the question actually. My great grandfather died 102 years and two days ago at No. 4 General Hospital in Camiers, and I guess I'd always mulled over when and how his funeral (of sorts) at Etaples took place.

I'd imagine that with the number of men who passed through Etaples that there would be 'group' burials where several men were buried as part of the same service,

 

Craig

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BIFFO

The same but different Etaples like Lijssenthok,had many stationary hospitals near by, if couldn't save and move casualty  on, in the event of D.O.W buried near to the time of death,I always find it strange when visiting Lijssenthoek to see  similar rank buried in lines so even in death class played a part

:poppy:

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LEUZEWOOD
18 hours ago, ss002d6252 said:

I'd imagine that with the number of men who passed through Etaples that there would be 'group' burials where several men were buried as part of the same service,

 

Craig

 

I think I have in fact seen photographs at Etaples of relatively long 'trenches' dug to accommodate several men. In fact my G Grandfather is buried next to a soldier of the same unit who died on the same day. I have always been intrigued as to whether they were together when they sustained their wounds or if it was just coincidence.

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Bardess

In one of the CCS diaries that I have transcribed [poss No 17] I think, if someone passed after noon, they were buried the next day

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303man
18 hours ago, BIFFO said:

The same but different Etaples like Lijssenthok,had many stationary hospitals near by, if couldn't save and move casualty  on, in the event of D.O.W buried near to the time of death,I always find it strange when visiting Lijssenthoek to see  similar rank buried in lines so even in death class played a part

:poppy:

 

Up until third Ypres Officers were buried in the front rows at Lijssenthoek in coffins other ranks in Blankets in trench burial,  take a closer look and you will see the Early Officer graves spaced apart and OR headstones butted together. see the attached image officer burials bottom right of the picture.

download.jpg

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LEUZEWOOD
30 minutes ago, 303man said:

 

Up until third Ypres Officers were buried in the front rows at Lijssenthoek in coffins other ranks in Blankets in trench burial,  take a closer look and you will see the Early Officer graves spaced apart and OR headstones butted together. see the attached image officer burials bottom right of the picture.

download.jpg

 

Yes, similar at Etaples. In fact I'd always wondered why the OR headstones were grouped in pairs rather than equally spaced? Presumably a symbolic gesture rather than them actually being buried together?

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johnboy

Who would have supplied the grave diggers, RAMC the hospital, CCS or French Civilians employed by the cemetry?

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BIFFO

could  have been any of the above +asc,they seem to have had a hand in everything 

:poppy:

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Wexflyer
2 hours ago, 303man said:

 

Up until third Ypres Officers were buried in the front rows at Lijssenthoek in coffins other ranks in Blankets in trench burial,  take a closer look and you will see the Early Officer graves spaced apart and OR headstones butted together. see the attached image officer burials bottom right of the picture.

 

And then what happened at/after third Ypres?

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303man
40 minutes ago, Wexflyer said:

 

And then what happened at/after third Ypres?

 

Put in the same trench as the Other Ranks the First Officer to be buried in the same row as the Other Ranks in Lijssenthoek was Lt Ronald Ross in late Aug 1917 Plot 18 Row C Grave 11

There are 9860 commonwealth troops buried in the Cemetery approximately 300,000 were treated in the adjoining casualty clearing station/Field Hospitals.  4000 of those buried are 3rd Ypres.  Roughly 97% of those treated survived.

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keithfazzani

In Civil society in peacetime burials would be much quicker than today, rarely more than a few days after death. 

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