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Sue L

understanding an injury abbreviation

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Sue L

hello 

Can anyone help me understand what this man's injury actually was - see attachment

 

Thanks

 

Sue L

hospital admission info.pdf

Apologies - it is Wm Weatherill I am interested in!

 

Sue

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MaxD

The I or 1 is to be related to (as it says above) the classification on the flyleaf which we can't see in that clip.  The Sev means severe (as opposed to Slt which is slight).  Another bit of coding then L (left) elbow.

 

Need to see more of the document.  Hang on - found the flyleaf.  If you are looking at it on Findmypast, then use the left arrow to go back to the beginning of the document.  You may get there first!

 

Max

Edited by MaxD
Addition

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MaxD

I read it as I (1) Gunshot wound to the head - contusions and simple flesh wounds -  severe.  The next one on the Left Elbow should be VIII - (4) (compound fractures of the upper extremities)which may belong to the chap below him.

 

 

There are two more records showing treatment which refer only to the first injury so I'd say the elbow was not him.

 

Max

Edited by MaxD
new info

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Sue L

Hi Max

Thanks for this suggestion which was very helpful.  I have found the flyleaf and think it translates as gunshot wound to the head with fracture of the cranium without depression.  I think the left elbow belongs to the person below

I've attached the images below in case you have further thoughts

 

Sue

 

hopital admission.jpg

flyleaf.jpg

I think we crossed messages!!  

Hi Max

 

I think you are right.  I have misread the (1) for a (2)  so not a fracture

 

Thanks again

 

Sue

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MaxD

I do think it says 1 1 rather than 1 2 but it looks as if the diagnosis changed.  In the other records it is shown as I 4 (twice and clearly)  - leave you to read it!  

 

Max

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MaxD

Optional extra - the hospital was in Camiers , wonderful photos of the village here:

https://histopale.net/les-archives/etaples/camiers/

 

There were a number of hospitals there, up to 10 at various times.  Can't find a pic identified as No 18, but No 20 comes up on a Google search.

 

Do you know where he was wounded originally?

 

Max

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Sue L

Hi Max

 

Thanks for sending this link - fantastic photos

 

I think he was wounded at High Wood on 15.9.16.  The final column of the admissions register (above) has this noted and I think it must be the place of action.  

 

Sue 

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MaxD

Really should have gone to youknowwhere!  Have you looked at the war diary?

 

Max

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Sue L

Not yet but will try that next!

 

Will go to you know where soon!!!

 

Thanks for your help

Sue

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MBrockway

This entry is also from No 18 General Hospital and barely ten weeks later.

 

1262568329_18GH-Dec1916.jpg.770276a384724550c3192052b6cd6453.jpg

 

The cases seem to be using a different classification system from that shown in your flyleaf above, but they are all medical cases rather than wounds.  There are some wound cases a few pages further on and these do follow the <Roman numeral>.(<Arabic numeral>) system (e.g. VIII.4) shown on the flyleaf.

 

Was there another classification on the other flyleaf covering medical cases?

 

Or can anyone point to a medical classification key elsewhere?

 

Mark

 

 

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Ron Clifton
On 22/08/2018 at 00:20, MBrockway said:

Or can anyone point to a medical classification key elsewhere?

Casualties and Medical Statistics, by Major T Mitchell, a volume of the Medical Official History Series, has a classification of illnesses. There are 99 separate entries!

 

Ron

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MBrockway
7 hours ago, Ron Clifton said:

Casualties and Medical Statistics, by Major T Mitchell, a volume of the Medical Official History Series, has a classification of illnesses. There are 99 separate entries!

 

Ron

 

Thanks Ron - that's a fantastic source and veritable mine of information!  The Preface is worth reading in its own right as a very clear explanation of how the medical statistics gathering planned at the start of the War became overwhelmed by the sheer volume of data as the Medical Research Committee entered the second half of the War.

 

However I cannot find any table in it that provides a key to the Non-Battle Casualties in the MH Admissions Register above

 

i.e. that cross-references ...

21   to Influenza

34   to Pyrexia of Uncertain Origin

339 to Inflammation of the Larynx

404 to Bronchitis

 

The Table with 99 separate numbered entries seems to be Table 20 on pp.285-6 and the various detailed tables immediately following.

 

Also since the Admissions Register uses three digit codes, we're passing 99 entries anyway.

 

Chapter XX gives the stats for the million or so men that were used as a representative sample once it was realised that full analysis would be beyond the capacity of the post-war resources available.  IIRC these data are the basis for the MH 106 data we have been left with.  This statement hints at the complexity of the intended scheme ...

 

"No volume of medical statistics would, however, be complete without a scientific analysis of the cases admitted to hospital for wounds, disease or injury, and the originators of the Medical History of the War had this in view when they outlined their elaborate scheme of tabulating results under a thousand and fifty headings" (p.278, my emboldening)

 

 ... which might match up with the Admissions Register's code for 404 Bronchitis etc., but the excellent Preface explains ...

 

"In order to facilitate completion, it had been decided to limit statistics in detail to some fifty of the more important diseases and group the remainder under their appropriate systems." (p. xiii)

 

That seems to correspond well with the 99 numbered headings in Table 20 on pp.285-6.

 

Can anyone add anything further on the "elaborate scheme of tabulating results under a thousand and fifty headings"?

 

Mark

 

Edited by MBrockway

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Sue L

Hi

 

I have another injury code to decifer which I think is linked to Mark's post above mentioning  a coding system well above 99 entries.  I've attached a scan of the entry but as far as I can see it looks like "952 ICJ Legs" 

 

The man is William Todd, 21st KRRC

 

Any thoughts??

Thanks

 

Sue

William Todd injury.pdf

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MBrockway

I.C.T. = Inflammation of the Connective Tissue

 

Were we looking at Todd earlier in the year?

 

850478417_TODDWilliamC-1204821-KRRCBWVMroll.jpg.e5afea4d1f9eefd4e48249efb09f211a.jpg

 

I made some notes on transcription errors in MH106 records of a July 1916 injury.

Edited by MBrockway

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MBrockway

If you're not aware of this, then it is likely to be of interest ...

 

My notes re the MH106 mistranscriptions from last Spring were a false alarm - they related to C/1210 Rfn Alan Todd, also of 21/KRRC.

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Sue L

Thanks again Mark

the translation of ICT is just what I needed!

Sue

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