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Sarah Reay

BECKETTS, MILLBANK & BATHURST Hospitals

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Sarah Reay

Hi,

 

I'm looking for any information or images of these three hospitals in London during the Great War please. I'm looking specifically at the time, November 1915 through to June 1916, although any general information or photographs would be interesting too. Thank you and fingers crossed.

 

Becketts Hospital (Hon. Mrs Beckett’s Hospital) - 34 Grosvenor Street, London (a Queen Alexandra hospital)
 
Millbank Hospital - Queen Alexandra's Military Hospital at Millbank, London (Hospital admission and discharge register on FindMyPast website already accessed)
(a Queen Alexandra hospital)
 
Bathurst Hospital (sometimes known as Bathurst House Hospital), 12 Belgrave Square, London. (British Red Cross Auxiliary Hospital)

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Sarah Reay

Thanks Terry. I should have said - the only information I have is from the 'Lost Hospitals in London' website. It's a good website, but it would be wonderful if I could find some more detailed information about the hospitals during the Great War. So, fingers crossed, somebody somewhere might know a little more ...

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Sarah Reay

Thanks Sue. Yes, this is it, although I wish they'd give a little more history about WW1. We'll keep digging ... there must be some more information out there somewhere?

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seaJane

It's Jane actually :)

 

Possible plan for temporary additional hospital at Millbank here: http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C2029648

Admission and discharge registers, operations books etc at MH 106 http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/results/r?_q=MH+106+Millbank

 

Red Cross archives may be able to help with Bathursts: https://www.redcross.org.uk/about-us/our-history/museum-and-archives

 

 

 

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IPT

Thanks, Mabel..

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seaJane

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Sarah Reay

Dear JANE!!!

 

Forgive me please! Terrible mistake to make!

 

Thank you for these three links. When I am next in London I will visit the Red Cross archives and The National Archives. I am particularly excited about TNA because who knows what might be in these records. My grandfather (Army Chaplain Rev. H.B. Cowl C.F. M.C. "The Half-Shilling Curate") was admitted to these three hospitals starting at Becketts in November 1915, through to Bathurst (House) Hospital in March 1916. I know he was operated on several times for reconstruction work on his face, jaw and neck. I live in Northumberland so I'm very much looking forward to my next trip to London - most probably in September. 

 

Thank you very much Jane!

 

Best wishes, Sarah.

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seaJane

No worries!

If your grandfather was an army chaplain it may also be worth contacting the Museum of Army Chaplaincy, still at Amport House for the moment:

https://www.chaplains-museum.co.uk

 

seaJane

Edited by seaJane

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Sarah Reay

Hi Jane,

 

Yes, I first visited the Museum of Army Chaplaincy when I was researching my grandfather's story before my book 'The Half-Shilling Curate' was published. David Blake, the curator at Amport House is a font of knowledge in the world of army chaplaincy.

 

If you don't know of it, do have a look at the website: www.halfshillingcurate.com You might be interested in the medical side of his story and the fact that he served in Portsmouth, Hampshire from the end of 1916 to the end of 1919.

 

Best wishes, Sarah.

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petestarling

Sarah

I have lectured on Millbank in the First World War including both the Royal Army Medical College and the QAMH. The hospital was a major hospital for jaw injuries  and the surgeon was Sir Francis Farmer. The Operation Books in MH106 at TNA show the many cases of jaws being operated on. Are the records on line with one of the ancestry web sites? that would save you a trip to Kew.

 

Pete

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Sarah Reay

Pete

 

That's very interesting. My grandfather's jaw was completely broken on one side so that explains why he was sent to Millbank. Dr Emily Mayhew has given me a few helpful tips to further my research. You have now given me a name, which is a great start - thank you.

 

Recently, I found a hospital admission and discharge register on the FindMyPast website. Prior to this I had believed my grandfather had only been at Beckett's Hospital. From what you have said, there is certainly a chance that my grandfather might be mentioned in one of these Operation Books? A chaplain without a voice would have been quite something, had they not fixed him. They weren't expecting him to be able to preach again, he had been hoping to simply regain his speech. In the end he was blessed with both speech and a voice for preaching! Although his voice was never the same again.

 

I can't wait to get back to Kew to see all these records!

 

Once again, thank you. Best wishes, Sarah.

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Sarah Reay
On 26/07/2018 at 15:12, petestarling said:

Sarah

I have lectured on Millbank in the First World War including both the Royal Army Medical College and the QAMH. The hospital was a major hospital for jaw injuries  and the surgeon was Sir Francis Farmer. The Operation Books in MH106 at TNA show the many cases of jaws being operated on. Are the records on line with one of the ancestry web sites? that would save you a trip to Kew.

 

Pete

Dear Pete,

 

Just a short note to say that last week I visited TNA and I looked at a huge area of the MH106 records. Unfortunately, the only notes in terms of Operation Books seemed to be 1917-1918, so I was unable to find any further information about my grandfather's surgery at the end of 1915 / beginning of 1916. I haven't been able to find out much about Sir Francis Farmer or Millbank. I wondered if you could recommend a website or book that would give more information?

 

Thanks Pete. Best wishes, Sarah.

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petestarling

Sarah  

The British Medical Journal has a very short obituary notice for Farmer on 13 January 1923.

https://bda.org/museum/Pages/index.aspx

 

The link is for the British Dental Association museum and they may be able to help with more information about Farmer.

 

Pete

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Sarah Reay

Thanks Pete - I'll check it out!

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