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squirrel

A Letter From France

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squirrel

 

Some members may remember the Monthly Great War Art Topic , where members suggested a topic for others to post a story, poem or art work and which ran for a number of years.

I contributed poems to those threads and have now had these poems and others, together with some short stories, published, some 53 pieces in all.

The poems and stories have been written over a number of years.

Essentially a personal tribute to those who served, those who came home and sadly, those who did not including members of my family.

The book can be purchased at £6.50 plus £1.50 UK p & p - please pm for details.

 

Front cover photo

 

A Letter From France  Front Cover.jpg

Edited by squirrel

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squirrel

I received this message today:

 

 
"A friend bought a copy of your book for me, which I have just read, and I think it's among the best Great War poetry that I have ever read, most impressive.
 
The poems are very readable: straightforward, in the way that Seigfried Sasson's often are, without employing the flowery language that many of the Great War poets used.  Wilfred Owen, for instance, wrote some truly wonderful poems, but some are hard work to read.
 
I think you have convincingly captured the words of the men in the trenches, despite obviously not having been there at the time yourself.  Obviously you are very well read on the subject and have the talent to convey your message.
 
Very well done - I am impressed.
 
Martin Body (a fellow student of the Great War)."
Edited by squirrel

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Gunboat

I’ve just finished this collection of poems and prose and I thoroughly enjoyed it and gladly recommend it to others. 

 

I think Tony captures the voice of Tommy Atkins in a Kiplingesque style that is quite refreshing to those of us brought with the war weary poetry of Owen. You get a real sense of the average soldier just getting on and making the

most of it -

offen under a heavy pack on a footsore march.

Even those poems that touch on

loss and rememberence focus on the heroism,sacrifice and sense of loss and doesnt seek

to portray the war as futile.

 

Selfishly it took me back to a happy time when a group of us used to submit work to the much missed Monthly Great War Art Thread and it was a huge pleasure to be part of a creative collective that had a shared interest in the Great War. I enjoyed Tony’s work then and I enjoy it now. 

 

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squirrel

I have been given a copy of your book of poetry “A letter from France” by my good friend, your brother Peter. I just wanted to thank you. I started reading last night and I have some way to go over the next few days to finish. I know from my own writing, how difficult it is to write about the horror of WW1. Honouring those who served, whilst maintaining that fragile, yet crucial position between mawkish voyeurism and trivialisation. Your meticulous research is clear and present throughout.
I have a lot still to read in the coming days, but in the meantime, thank you.
With best wishes,
Alison Raymond
(Ps the historical notes and also the factual detail regarding Frederick were really helpful in contextualising and providing access to your poetry).
 

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squirrel
Posted (edited)

The June edition of WFA Stand To! arrived this morning and there is a short review of my book

"A Letter From France - poems and stories of World War One".  

Reviewed by Steven Broomfield on the Garrison Library pages:

"Poetry from the Heart, Anthony G Nutkins (£6.50, 64pp. ISBN 978-191-208-266-7) is a labour of love by the author, whose uncle, Frederick Charles Nutkins, was killed serving with the Machine Gun Corps in 1918. Inspired by a family visit to his grave in 2003 and many subsequent visits, the author has produced this tribute to his uncle and all who served. Members of the Great War Forum may recognise some of the works from "Squirrel" online.

The contents take us through the war from "The Regulars 1914" (We'll never see their like again/Remember always it's writ plain/The BEF was "That perfect thing apart"), to a reworking of John McCrae's famous poem ("In Flanders' flooded, frozen fields we lie/unknown and unseen/no cross or headstone marks our place/no cemetery turfed in green"). The poetry is bookended by photographs of the graves of Privates Parr -and Ellison - Parr alleged to be the first, and Ellison definitely the last fatality of the BEF - both buried in the same cemetery. It is the loss and sense of futility that comes across so strongly in this heartfelt collection. To order a copy contact the author direct - nutkinsagn@hotmail.com."

Edited by squirrel

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