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Remembered Today:

Help required French Map Ref coordinates


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I'm sure there are threads on this. Which software would I need to overlay maps on google earth. Would a map moron of my level manage it?

 

Mike

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Martin Feledziak

Here is a handy youtube video which is fairly good.

It is done with a mac but the presentation is OK.

 

It will give you a good idea of how to do it.

 

 

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Hello Skip et al:

 

Life Lesson #1: Lambert maps are an absolute b*stard.

 

I've spoken with a gentleman who I suspect to be an expert on the subject and he provided me the following information. If anyone who is smarter than me wants to try to run this through a GIS program they're more than welcome to it. I've used the Nord de Guerre projection but it seems to be off.

 

Quote

The système Lambert projection is a Lambert Conformal Conic with standard parallels at 47.7° N and 52.3° N, central meridian at 7.737229° E, latitude of origin 49.5° N, false easting 500000, and false northing 300000. I got these values from the French survey reports published just after the war (and converting French grades to degrees).

 

I see you've previously received a copy of a Jonchery map, but what it didn't include (at least publicly) was the edges that would give the base coordinates to do a plot. If you can send that to me, I can put you on the right track and double check the work Howard did.

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Fun homework assignment!

 

Here's a trig list the French used for their maps. Maybe a map fiend can cross reference WGS84 lat longs to this madness.

trig list.jpg

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By Jove23, I need a map, I'm lost :D

 

The only map I have is the one from the brigade diary Click Howard is the man with the French maps. At a guess, how far out is our mark in post #16  likely to be?

 

Thanks for your input, appreciate it.

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As far as the first set of coordinates, I'd say it's bang on. I've marked the area in a red halo, as I believe these coordinates are on a grid system and not an exact coordinate system, so anything in that ring would most likely be "snapped" to those coordinates. 

 

Here's the Jonchery-sur-Vesle map. I cannot read the side coordinates so i can't give you a good fix yet. Maybe Howard can dig up a better version?

 

Best,

Justin

James-Campbell-1.png

James-Campbell-2.png

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  • 3 months later...

This is the wood which was taken on 1st August from both sides, as part of the capture of the ridge above BEUGNEUX.  it's only when you stand on top of the hill above Beugneux, do you really appreciate how strategically significant it was to the Germans.

Hill 158.PNG

Hill 158 - Wood.png

Hill 158 - from visit.PNG

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  • 4 months later...

Been studying this in a bit more detail recently and it is now blindingly obvious to me that this feature is "Hill 158" the very one that the 1/5th A & SH took on 1/8/1918

 

Mike

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 12/04/2019 at 10:51, Skipman said:

Been studying this in a bit more detail recently and it is now blindingly obvious to me that this feature is "Hill 158" the very one that the 1/5th A & SH took on 1/8/1918

 

Mike

Exactly correct. I walked this last year and it is a small hill just south of Beugneux that was flanked on both sides. It held multiple German MG nests and overlooked the whole advance.  It is thickly wooded these days and there was a rather large bull protecting the entrance.

 

But you can still see shell holes and slit trenches on the ground. Although the hill isn’t very high (only a couple a metres above surrounding area) it does afford excellent views of the advance since the approach is entirely flat.

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Just now, Skipman said:

Excellent r.m.willis, thanks for the confirmation.

 

Mike

You’re welcome.

i just looked through my photos from 2018 & the only one I have is of the very large & imposing bull! 

 

I am there again next month so will take some more snaps and post them.

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2 minutes ago, r.m.willis said:

 

 the only one I have is of the very large & imposing bull!  He'll be a big pussycat :D

 

 

I am there again next month so will take some more snaps and post them. That would be great.

 

 

Mike

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15 minutes ago, Skipman said:

Does anyone know how to pronounce Beugneux?

 

My guess Bo-nyu (U as in luck)

 

Mike

I go with Ber Ner or bern yer depending on my mood

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3 hours ago, Skipman said:

 

Ask the locals when you're there. :thumbsup:

 

Mike

 

I tried that to obtain a definitive answer for Mametz.  The first I got was Ma-metz; the second was Ma-may.  So no nearer finding out!

 

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6 minutes ago, Don Regiano said:

 

I tried that to obtain a definitive answer for Mametz.  The first I got was Ma-metz; the second was Ma-may.  So no nearer finding out!

 

 

I think Ma-may is correct.

 

Mike

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9 hours ago, Skipman said:

 

I think Ma-may is correct.

 

Mike

That was my original thought Mike but then I was reminded of the pronunciation of the town (city?) of Metz.

 

Reg

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  • 7 months later...

Hi, hope it is ok to resurrect this old discussion however it is quite relevant to my research.

My great uncle (Pte C.F. Briggs) was killed on 24 Jul 1918 as part of attack with the 1/1 Herefords.  He was re-buried at the Raperie British cemetery which I will hopefully visit next year.

From what I have read they came under extreme MG fire in corn fields near Tigny.

I would like to identify an approximate location of his original burial site which is shown in the "Concentration" document below.

Any insight appreciated, or perhaps a similar map extract to #11 above covering the nearby coordinates required.

Thank-you

JB

Concentration_Extract.PNG

Edited by JHB
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JB it wouuld be worth sending a private message to some of the extremely knowledeagble and helpful members who helped so readily on this thread.

 

Might also be best to start a new thread, specific to your soldier.

 

Mike

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14 hours ago, Skipman said:

JB it wouuld be worth sending a private message to some of the extremely knowledeagble and helpful members who helped so readily on this thread.

 

Might also be best to start a new thread, specific to your soldier.

 

Mike

Thanks for your suggestion Mike.  I have started a new thread. (not sure how to link to it)

Cheers

JB

Edited by JHB
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On 27/04/2019 at 09:07, Skipman said:

Does anyone know how to pronounce Beugneux?

 

My guess Bo-nyu (U as in luck)

 

Mike

 

Badmenil-aux-Bois (bad may nil' loh bwah), I-42
Badonviller (ba dong vi yay'), p-40
Badonvilliers (ba dong vi li ehr'), c-39
Bagneux (ba nyiih'), f-39
Baignes (ben'), g-53
Bailleul (ba i yuhl'), C-9

 

and I'm sure it was you that pointed me in the direction of this little gem...

 

selfpronouncing900rand.pdf

 

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