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paul leeson

Medals found with out ribbons

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paul leeson

Hi,  The medals of my Great Uncle were found recently but with out ribbons, just wrapped in old [possibly the original] tissue paper.  He was in the BEF but died in 1916 so never saw them.  Is that how they were originaly issued and the owner then had the ribbon fitted and put on a brooch of the correct size?

Thank you.

Paul

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PhilB

NO, they arrived with ribbons.:thumbsup:

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Andrew Upton
Posted (edited)

As issued, ordinary WW1 British campaign medals were supplied in a white cardboard box. The medal itself would be in a small paper envelope, with a length of the correct silk ribbon included but not actually attached to the medal. This would then be mounted by the recipient as they deemed fit:

 

Image result for ww1 boxed medals

 

Image result for ww1 boxed medals

 

 

 

 

Edited by Andrew Upton

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wmfinch

Hello Paul,

 

How wonderful that a medal set awarded to a relative has come to light.

 

If you wish to replace the ribbons, these can easily be found on ebay by searching for WW1 medal ribbons.  The cost is pretty low.  Just make sure you purchase the correct ribbons for the individual medals.

 

Cheers,

 

Wayne

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paul leeson
1 hour ago, wmfinch said:

Hello Paul,

 

How wonderful that a medal set awarded to a relative has come to light.

 

If you wish to replace the ribbons, these can easily be found on ebay by searching for WW1 medal ribbons.  The cost is pretty low.  Just make sure you purchase the correct ribbons for the individual medals.

 

Cheers,

 

Wayne

Thank you Wayne.  I intend to.  Paul

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Kimberley John Lindsay

Dear Paul,

If you want to get it really right, obtain original silk, watered, ribbons. These are more expensive than the cotton, printed, ribbons, which emerged in the 1970s in my experience, and are 'not a patch' on the silk ones!

Personally, I would have the medals mounted for wear - but that depends on your preference.

Several of the mounted medal groups in my collection (including my grandfather's AIF Military Cross group), are housed in deep frames, with a photograph of the recipient behind the medals.

Kindest regards,

Kim.

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paul leeson
16 hours ago, PhilB said:

NO, they arrived with ribbons.:thumbsup:

Thank you PhilB.  Paul.

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PhilB

I would echo Kim`s sentiment - get the correct silk, watered ribbons, not modern cheap copies. You won`t regret it!

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paul leeson
Posted (edited)
17 hours ago, Andrew Upton said:

As issued, ordinary WW1 British campaign medals were supplied in a white cardboard box. The medal itself would be in a small paper envelope, with a length of the correct silk ribbon included but not actually attached to the medal. They would then be mounted by the recipient as they deemed fit:

 

Quote

Many thanks Andrew. Most useful reply.  The only other thing I have is a letter to his brother [my Grandad] which came with his 1914 star explaining it was sent in memory of his service etc etc. It is dated 14th Oct 1919 [about 2 and half years after original issue of the medal?]. Paul

 

 

Edited by paul leeson

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paul leeson
4 hours ago, Kimberley John Lindsay said:

Dear Paul,

If you want to get it really right, obtain original silk, watered, ribbons. These are more expensive than the cotton, printed, ribbons, which emerged in the 1970s in my experience, and are 'not a patch' on the silk ones!

Personally, I would have the medals mounted for wear - but that depends on your preference.

Several of the mounted medal groups in my collection (including my grandfather's AIF Military Cross group), are housed in deep frames, with a photograph of the recipient behind the medals.

Kindest regards,

Kim.

Thank you Kim.  Good advice.  Paul.

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Andrew Upton
4 hours ago, paul leeson said:

The only other thing I have is a letter to his brother [my Grandad] which came with his 1914 star explaining it was sent in memory of his service etc etc. It is dated 14th Oct 1919 [about 2 and half years after original issue of the medal?]. Paul

 

Although created in early 1917, initial issue of the ribbon for the 1914 Star was not effectively until early 1918, with actual issue of the medal itself not commencing until 1919. So the letter ties in perfectly with when the medal would have been first issued.

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paul leeson

Thank you again Andrew, most informative.

Paul

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eairicbloodaxe
Posted (edited)

I cant remember exactly what I paid for the original unused silk ribbons for the ww1 pair medals I have. But I do recall the difference was something like £6 for repro and £12 for originals from a well known auction site. NOt much in the scheme of things.

 

For maybe a tenner extra, get the real thing and honour the man properly. It took a few auctions to get them, but is worth it.

 

Regards

 

 

Ian

Edited by eairicbloodaxe

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paul leeson

Thank you Ian.  A 'Well known auction site' what could that be. Ho Ho.  Paul

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