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stevebecker

German Nurses in Palestine

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stevebecker

Mates,

 

I wonder what you have on a number of German Nurses sent to Palestine during the war?

 

'Princess Brigitte Reuss    Nurse    att Ottoman Red Cross (Cresant) hosp 

 

Koch Paula     Nurse    Hosp unit         daughter of Chief Eng Schellens 
 

Baroness Veronika von Wechmar    Nurse    att Ottoman Red Cross (Cresant) hosp 

 

Cheers


S.B

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michaeldr

 

There is an interesting article here http://www.palestine-studies.org/jq/fulltext/195195 which describes the Medical Mission at Hafir-el-Auja

quote: The nursing team consisted of four German deaconesses: Sophie, Louisa, Hannah and Lena. They were from the Prussian Kaiserwerth Hospital of the Knights of the Order of St John (a 60-bed hospital in Beirut …..)
 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auja_al-Hafir#/media/File:Turkish_military_town_of_Hafir_el_Aujah,_the_principal_desert_base,_1916.jpg

 

There is still a lot to be seen at this site even today and the local WW1 Heritage Society paid a visit there only a few months ago

 

P1070089.JPG.58ba579eba5b49a65fee360b405afb6e.JPG

The main building on the hill overlooking the wells, the Ottoman camp, the railway line and station

 

P1070102.JPG.e8ab0424f6db8e3e63c8a87d56497450.JPG

The remains of one of the Ottoman building in their base at the foot of the steps

 

P1070112.thumb.JPG.cb08557ffcb9b56d23c8a74dbd496ecf.JPG

The steps leading down from the main building on the hill to the general area of the Ottoman base

 

P1070091.JPG.12e081647348bb71c3e7af3d61b974dc.JPG

The remains of a Byzantine basilica in the foreground and behind the trees, the water tower serving the Ottoman railway line

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michaeldr

Re-reading your op Steve, I think that I originally miss-interpreted it

You're looking for information only on these three specific ladies?

Edited by michaeldr

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michaeldr
11 hours ago, stevebecker said:

Princess Brigitte Reuss    Nurse    att Ottoman Red Cross (Cresant) hosp 

 

Possibly the daughter of Heinrich XXV:

born 31 January 1889 - Altona,

died  7 January 1929 - Groß-Krausche,

age at death: 39 years old

(possibly also related to Oberleutnant z S. Prinz Reuss who is seen in the background of the first photograph here http://www.gallipoli1915.de/naval-support-command

[in the right foreground Admirals Usedom and Märten])

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stevebecker

Michael,

 

No worries mate any details on these nurses with the Ottoman Army is of interest.

 

I noticed a Photo of German Airman that had these nurses with them at a dinner. And with so little details on the German hosps used in this area any look at them is gold.

 

I did find another nurse

 

Ingelfingen Marie zu Hohenlohe    Nurse Sister    unknown Medical unit         died 17-5-18 grave at Tarabya Istanbul 
 

No details on her or her death?

 

Cheers


S.B

Edited by stevebecker

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seaJane

Tarabya is the site of the old (Crimean-era) Royal Naval hospital at Therapia, and if I recall aright there is a Forum Pal local to the cemetery there. Can't recall his name though.

 

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b3rn

Hi Steve, here is a nurse’s grave in Istanbul, taken in 2017. (I will look later if I photographed Marie’s grave.)

 

This link has more photos from that day: 

Can you share the photo of the German airmen and nurses?

 

 

84C5D2CE-F5BA-4F4D-8392-FF377DD5B8A8.jpeg

Edited by b3rn

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b3rn

IMG_7047.JPG

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michaeldr
12 hours ago, stevebecker said:

Ingelfingen Marie zu Hohenlohe    Nurse Sister    unknown Medical unit         died 17-5-18 grave at Tarabya Istanbul 

 

This website should be of help
quote:
Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen Marie Agnes Prinzessin zu, Krankenschwester, born 27.09.1883 Koschentin, Lublinetz and died 17.05.1918 im Etappen Laz II, Konstantinopel, Fernaki.  Was with the military mission in Turkey and died „an Fleckfieber“ [typhus fever]
Her full name was Maria Agnes Amelie Elise zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen and she was the youngest of 5 children from Prinz Friedrich Wilhelm Eduard Alexander zu Hohenlohe-Ingelfingen, a Prussian general and lord of Koschentin and countess Anna Caroline Louise Amalie Auguste von Giech
Buried at Istanbul-Tarabya (Deutsche Kriegsgräberstätte), Türkei
(from https://germannursesofthegreatwar.wordpress.com/the-list/)

Edited by michaeldr

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michaeldr
16 hours ago, b3rn said:

84C5D2CE-F5BA-4F4D-8392-FF377DD5B8A8.jpeg

 

from the same website: https://germannursesofthegreatwar.wordpress.com/the-list/

Gagern Elisabeth von, Rot Kreuz Schwester, born 6/8/1887 and died 2/5/1916 at Constantinopel, mentioned as gestorben bei der Kriegspflege“
We know that she particpated in a tour to the POW camps in Russia together with Generaloberin Mathilde Freiin von Horn, Alexandrine Gräfin von Üxkull-Gyllenband, Erika von Passow, Magdalene von Walsleben und Oberin Emma von Bülow in 1915/1916, they had to check on the circumstances in which the men lived, if they were able to practice their religion and if they were buried in good circumstances when needed.  We know that in 1916 she also had a meeting with Grand Duchess Maria Pavlovna of Russia on the matter of the POW camps.
Buried at Istanbul-Tarabya (Deutsche Kriegsgräberstätte), Türkei

Edited by michaeldr

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michaeldr

Another German nurse buried at Tarabya

details from the same list as above: https://germannursesofthegreatwar.wordpress.com/the-list/

Hof Clara, Krankenschwester, died 9/10/1917
Buried at Sammelgrab 1
Istanbul-Tarabya (Deutsche Kriegsgräberstätte), Türkei

 

edit to add: for some reason she is recorded as Nurse Court Clara 09/10/1917 “Collecting grave 1” on this website

http://www.denkmalprojekt.org/2015/istanbul-tarabya(deutsche-kriegsgraeberstaette_tr.html

Edited by michaeldr

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b3rn

Thanks Michael, hadn’t come across that website before.

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michaeldr


When looking at the staffing of the medical units on the Ottoman side in the Palestine campaign it is worth remembering

a] that they made use of the facilities in Jerusalem provided by various Christian religious orders; German, Austrian and others 
and b] that up until their entry on the Allied side in late 1917, there was also an American contribution to the Turkish effort in this theatre 

 

00026v.jpg
00027v.jpg [note the American flag]
00028v.jpg
00029v.jpg
00030v.jpg
00031v.jpg

 

Four Christian sisters at Hafir (as mentioned in post No.2 above)
00045v.jpg

 

Beersheva
00143v.jpg

 

Beit Hanun
00156v.jpg

 

Jerusalem
00091v.jpg
00092v.jpg
00104v.jpg
00211v.jpg

 

 

Mr Whiting was at some time the US Consul in Jerusalem and with his wife, he helped in recruiting nursing staff for the Ottomans, from the American colony in that city
http://memory.loc.gov/phpdata/pageturner.php?type=contactminor&cmIMG1=/pnp/ppmsca/13700/13709/00244t.gif&agg=ppmsca&item=13709&caption=243

 

see also http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/americancolony/amcolony-ww1.html#obj32b

in particular the third illustration, which is a photograph of a list of  thirty 'Names of Nurses From the American Colony'

Edited by michaeldr

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stevebecker

Michael,

 

Thanks mate very interesting

 

S.B

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stevebecker

Mickael,

 

I was wondering what a number of German units were shown on the graves?

 

Borch Heinrich von d.    ESK6b

 

Geuther Paul    Dvr    EBSK3.
 

 

I was thinking they maybe a Sqn (SK) or company (K) 

 

Any ideas?

 

Cheers

 

S.B

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michaeldr

Steve,

 

ESK is the abbreviation for Eisenbahnsonderkommando 
which translates as “special railroad service command”

 

EBSK does not seem to be covered here http://www.znaci.net/00002/323.pdf
(NB: this list is WWII and WWI could well have been different, or, perhaps there is a transcription error?)

 

EDIT to add: on reflection, EBSK could be just a variation of ESK with the B of 'bahn' added

 

regards

Michael

Edited by michaeldr

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stevebecker

Mate,

 

Thank you

 

I was thinking they maybe from the Ottoman Sqn's (Tayyare Boluk (Aircraft Company) but that puts pay to that idea.

 

Is that the same for this man's unit?

 

Mertens Johann    Utffz.    EBBK 34/48
 

Cheers

 

S.B

Edited by stevebecker

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