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Hi all,

 

Sorry to post again regarding the Royal Field Artillery but I am stuck again! 

 

My soldier is Arthur Cox A/Cpl 80216 (service records are on Ancestry).

 

I am just trying to check where his last few months were via a war diary and have looked on the Long Lang Trail at the RFA batteries and formations and wanted to check that I am on the right lines please - 

 

In May 1915 Arthur was with D/110

reading the LLT  Long Long Trail RFA

 

  • "On 31 May 1916 the brigade was reorganised. A, C and D (Howitzer) Batteries all left and became the D (Howitzer) Batteries of 110,111 and 112 Brigades respectively. They were replaced by the D Batteries (field gun units) from those brigades"

 

i think that the men of D/110 were transferred to the A/113 at the end of May 1915 which fits in with Arthurs service records - The second part of his service saw Arthur return to the TOW on 25th Sept 1915.  He was posted to the A Battery of 113 Brigade.... I am understanding this to be a "field Guns" battery

 

From then he remained with A/113 until Dec 1916 when he moved to B/113

 

Arthur was recorded as being with B/113 when he died of wounds on 18th Dec 1918.  BUT the 113 Brigade broke up in Feb 1917 and became the new C Battery with the 172 Brigade 36th (Ulster) Division  - or thats what I think happened!

LLt - 

  • On 22 February 1917 B Battery (field guns) of 172 Brigade of 36th (Ulster) Division and became a new C Battery. A section of two joined from C (Howitzer) Battery of 172 Brigade and was used to bring D (Howitzer) Battery up to six howitzers.

 

So how did Arthur still belong to B/113 in Dec 1918?

 

I feel i've missed something and wondered if anyone could help with the last part of the service for Arthur? 

 

I would like to view the War Dairies for his final days but need to work out who he was actually serving with firstly.

 

Thank you in advance for any comments.

Edited by loujn
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2 hours ago, loujn said:

BUT the 113 Brigade broke up in Feb 1917

Hello loujn

 

113 Brigade left 25 Division in Feb 1917 but it was not broken up: it became an Army Field Artillery Brigade, independent of any division but able to be used wherever it was needed to support attacks. Just prior to that, its C Battery had been broken up to make A and B Batteries up from four guns to six each, so it is likely that Arthur was moved from A to B Battery at that time. All these, and D/110 before May 1916, were armed with the 18-pounder gun.

 

113 Brigade remained an Army Field Artillery Brigade for the rest of the war. Its War Diary can be downloaded from the Kew website, www.nationalarchives.gov.uk for £3.50. The reference is:

WO 95/295 113 Army Field Artillery Brigade 1917 Mar. - 1919 Oct.  
There are four diaries in the same box so you may have to add /3 after the reference. These diaries are not yet available on Ancestry.

 

The information about B/172 is misleading: this battery became C Battery 113 Brigade.

 

Good hunting!

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton
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4 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Hello loujn

 

113 Brigade left 25 Division in Feb 1917 but it was not broken up: it became an Army Field Artillery Brigade, independent of any division but able to be used wherever it was needed to support attacks. Just prior to that, its C Battery had been broken up to make A and B Batteries up from four guns to six each, so it is likely that Arthur was moved from A to B Battery at that time. All these, and D/110 before May 1916, were armed with the 18-pounder gun.

 

113 Brigade remained an Army Field Artillery Brigade for the rest of the war. Its War Diary can be downloaded from the Kew website, www.nationalarchives.gov.uk for £3.50. The reference is:

WO 95/295 113 Army Field Artillery Brigade 1917 Mar. - 1919 Oct.  
There are four diaries in the same box so you may have to add /3 after the reference. These diaries are not yet available on Ancestry.

 

God hunting!

 

Ron

 

Hi Ron, 

 

Thank you for your explanation.  I am not finding the RFA very easy to get to grips with!

 

I will download the war diary.  

 

Thank you for your time..

 

Louise

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Hello Louise

 

Glad to help!

 

The information I have (some of which is also on The Long, Long Trail) comes from Order of Battle of Divisions, Parts 3A and 3B by Major A F Becke, part of the British Official History series. Becke was an officer of the RFA and a large proportion of the footnotes to his various charts relate to the reorganisations of May 1916 and Jan/Feb 1917 in particular. Resolving the various moves is like trying to complete a thousand-piece jigsaw with no picture on the box!

 

Ron

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2 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Resolving the various moves is like trying to complete a thousand-piece jigsaw with no picture on the box!

 

 

Ha Ha - i think i won't even try then! 

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