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Remembered Today:

L/Cpl Reginald A Stock, Royal Engineers


Kingygirl22
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I am hoping that, yet again, a Forum member will be able to explain something that is causing me some confusion. 

 

I am researching  WR/20379 L/Cpl Stock, R.A. of 302 RCC, Royal Engineers.  According to his service record, he died from influenza at 29 CCS  on 20/2/1919,  and it specifies he died in France. Why then is he buried in Cologne South Cemetery?  

 

LLT places 29 CCS at Delsaux Farm, West of Bapaume from October 1918 until February 1919.  From reading http://www.vlib.us/medical/CCS/ccs.htm I discovered that 29 CCS was there until the 14th of February 1919.  This date is pertinent to my query as my soldier died from influenza on 20/2/1919.  If, as all his records say he died at 29 CCS, why would he be transferred all the way to Cologne?  I can't find anything to say the unit moved to Germany after Delsaux Farm but is this a likely explanation?    I can't think of another which is why I am asking for help. 

The CWGC website advises that allied prisoners from various burial sites were concentrated to Cologne and three other cemeteries.  I haven't seen any mention of Reggie being a prisoner.  Maybe he was one of the occupying forces in Cologne after the Armistice which again suggests the 29th moved there. 

 

Any help or suggestions gratefully received.

 

Edited by Kingygirl22
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  After posting I came across a press cutting from a local paper that I forgot I had  Really sorry.  It's an age thing..  

 

Apparently his mother received a letter advising her that he had died in hospital in Bonn, having been admitted with influenza and pneumonia.  He died the following day.  So why his record stipulates he died in France I don't know.  I suppose it was a really busy time for the clerks keeping the paperwork up to date. 

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Very odd this.

Soldiers Effects records also repeat the 29th CCS death.

Don't know if you have it, but there is a very good entry for him on de Ruvigny's RoH. This info would have been supplied by his family but it says he died in Bown and was buried in Poppelsdorfer Cemetery. I presume Bown was a typo for Bonn?

 

BillyH.

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For the effects branch to be wrong and the CWGC data it appears that the `source data reaching the record office was wrong - it was at that point where the various record sets seemed to diverge.

 

Craig

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This is a very long shot by way of explanation.

A GERMAN soldier by the name of Alfred Stock was killed on 17th August 1918 and is buried in Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension  - - - - -  and in August 1918 the 29th CCS was at Gezaincourt.

Perhaps, given they had the same name the records were mixed up?

 

BillyH.

 

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8 minutes ago, BillyH said:

This is a very long shot by way of explanation.

A GERMAN soldier by the name of Alfred Stock was killed on 17th August 1918 and is buried in Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension  - - - - -  and in August 1918 the 29th CCS was at Gezaincourt.

Perhaps, given they had the same name the records were mixed up?

 

BillyH.

 

I fully suspect a record mix-up and that one sounds entirely plausible.

 

Craig

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 Glad you all feel it is an oddity and not just my misreading of records.  The German soldier link is very plausible.  Had looked at the De Ruvigny's entry but hadn't picked up on the cemetery details. Thanks to all for taking the time to look into this on my behalf. 

Edited by Kingygirl22
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I may well have solved the mystery!   I looked up the Matron-in-Chief's War Diary for 1919 (available at scarletfinders.co.uk) and made a real discovery.  In March 1919, the Matron writes of her visit to  Germany and on 2nd March while in BONN, she details her visits to No 21and No 29 CCS.  The following quote is from the diary entry following her  visit to No 29 CCS. The underlining is mine.  

"We then went to 29 CCS, OC Lt. Colonel Carmichael, Sister i/c, Sister Cameron, RRC, TFNS. This is a magnificent establishment, situated in a huge park. There are two buildings, one of which is set apart for the men, and the other, a great big red-brick, five-storied house for officers, and the Medical Officers and nursing staff to be accommodated on two different floors. The building for the men was solid, it had only recently opened up, and seemed very comfortable, but the cooking, I should think, was very bad."

 

Sorry to have sent you all on a wild goose chase, but I am pretty happy to have found this as previous sources I looked up suggested 29 CCS had disbanded in France.  So an abject apology for doubting the clerks who wrote up the records, they were correct after all, and a huge thanks to the scarletfinders website.  

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Excellent work Kingygirl, you'll soon be a 2nd Lt. I think  :thumbsup:

 

BillyH.

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That would be very nice.  I'll keep on with my research then and hope to find another query to put to you all. 

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