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GreyC

Question for native speakers of English, BE, AE or other

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GreyC

Hi,

just came across the word "booty". I wonder how it´s use differs from that of prey. My understanding is that prey refers more to animals and hunting whereas booty refers to things taken by pirates, burglars,  soldiers/mercenaries after having robbed/looted a place?

Can someone please help clarify this for me?

Thank you,

GreyC

Edited by GreyC

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PhilB

I would say that, in English English, booty has no connection with prey. It is the proceeds of an enterprise as you suggest.

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Moonraker

That's correct, GreyC. I did Google the word, and there's another meaning, helpfully  illustrated by a YouTube video clip that appeared at the top of my screen featuring a song by Jennifer Lopez.  I won't link to it, because it would take us off-topic.

 

Some of us might use the word lightheartedly to refer to acquisitions made at a collectors' fair or clearance sale, for example.

 

Moonraker

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GreyC

Thank´s a lot to both of you, gentlemen!

GreyC

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The Prussian

Hello!

In my dictionary, "booty" has two meanings:

1. (Kriegs) Beute, Raub (legal or criminal)

2. Beute, Fang (zoology)

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GreyC

Thanks Andy!

I have the suspicion, though, that the use in zoology might be possible but is not in use as much as prey.

GreyC

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Lawryleslie

Just to add that "Booty", short for "Bootneck",  is also the generic nickname given to HM Royal Marines by their Naval seagoing counterparts.

Edited by Lawryleslie

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Beechhill
19 hours ago, Moonraker said:

That's correct, GreyC. I did Google the word, and there's another meaning, helpfully  illustrated by a YouTube video clip that appeared at the top of my screen featuring a song by Jennifer Lopez.  I won't link to it, because it would take us off-topic.

 

Some of us might use the word lightheartedly to refer to acquisitions made at a collectors' fair or clearance sale, for example.

 

Moonraker

I'd say even the acquisition of the contemporary colloquialism involves a good deal of enterprise and conquest, so not entirely off topic. 

 

I'll get me coat ... 

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PhilB

Here`s what the Oxford English Dictionary says:-

IMG_2575.JPG

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GreyC

Thank you alle for your contributions!

The contemporary German word for booty is BEUTE.

GreyC

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SiegeGunner

Booty = plunder or 'the spoils of war'.  In translation of, for example, an after-raid report, 'Beute' = captured documents/equipment/weapons.

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Ron Clifton

Its use to mean "captured" is quite well known in connection with tanks - "beutepanzer" meaning a British tank salvaged and used by the Germans.

 

Ron

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healdav

Royal Marines are known in the RN as Boots, not booty (because they wore boots on the sailing ships when sailors were usually bare foot).

I have a bill sent by the US Army in 1919 demanding that Luxembourg pay an amount greater than the entire national budget at the time 'in lieu of booty of war' for the value of a branch line which the Austrians had built during the war. It details exactly how many sleepers, rails (including spares), bolts and bit and pieces. It also says that no value has been charged for the bridges, viaducts and cutting. Gosh, thanks.

The bill, which was presented on a proforma that you would use for buying pencils, was eventually squashed after an almighty row in which the US Embassy and even State Department took on the army.

Som, booty is what you can get your hands on. Pillaging by any other word; or stealing if you like. Also known as liberating.

 

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Lawryleslie
5 hours ago, healdav said:

Royal Marines are known in the RN as Boots, not booty (because they wore boots on the sailing ships when sailors were usually bare foot).

I have a bill sent by the US Army in 1919 demanding that Luxembourg pay an amount greater than the entire national budget at the time 'in lieu of booty of war' for the value of a branch line which the Austrians had built during the war. It details exactly how many sleepers, rails (including spares), bolts and bit and pieces. It also says that no value has been charged for the bridges, viaducts and cutting. Gosh, thanks.

The bill, which was presented on a proforma that you would use for buying pencils, was eventually squashed after an almighty row in which the US Embassy and even State Department took on the army.

Som, booty is what you can get your hands on. Pillaging by any other word; or stealing if you like. Also known as liberating.

 

You’re wrong mate. Spent enough time serving with Booties to know that a Royal Marine was and still is known as a "Booty" or "Bootneck". Nothing to do with them wearing boots on sailing ships either. Their nickname is derived from their No 1 tunic which has a high collar and to stop this from chafing their neck Royal Marines would stitch an old soft  leather tongue from a well worn pair of boots around the inside of the collar. Hence Bootneck.

Edited by Lawryleslie

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healdav
8 hours ago, Lawryleslie said:

You’re wrong mate. Spent enough time serving with Booties to know that a Royal Marine was and still is known as a "Booty" or "Bootneck". Nothing to do with them wearing boots on sailing ships either. Their nickname is derived from their No 1 tunic which has a high collar and to stop this from chafing their neck Royal Marines would stitch an old soft  leather tongue from a well worn pair of boots around the inside of the collar. Hence Bootneck.

Never ever heard them called anything but Boots. In fact, when I was at Staff College the Marine Officer used to describe himself as a Boot. To be fair, he was thick as two short planks.

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PhilB
24 minutes ago, healdav said:

Never ever heard them called anything but Boots. In fact, when I was at Staff College the Marine Officer used to describe himself as a Boot. To be fair, he was thick as two short planks.

You give me great confidence in the Staff College and its graduates.:(

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Lawryleslie
2 hours ago, healdav said:

Never ever heard them called anything but Boots. In fact, when I was at Staff College the Marine Officer used to describe himself as a Boot. To be fair, he was thick as two short planks.

Similarly never heard them referred to as Boots. I was talking to a friend who served with 29 Commando RA and he confirmed the reason for the nickname "Bootnecks". He did say that the USAMC are known as "Leathernecks" for similar reason. Maybe Boots is officer speak but I’ve certainly never heard of it until now.

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healdav
4 hours ago, Lawryleslie said:

Similarly never heard them referred to as Boots. I was talking to a friend who served with 29 Commando RA and he confirmed the reason for the nickname "Bootnecks". He did say that the USAMC are known as "Leathernecks" for similar reason. Maybe Boots is officer speak but I’ve certainly never heard of it until now.

Over many, many years, going back into my childhood, Marines were always called, and called themselves Boots. Never Booty.

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Lawryleslie
16 hours ago, healdav said:

Over many, many years, going back into my childhood, Marines were always called, and called themselves Boots. Never Booty.

It’s very strange this. In my 34 year RN career I served with 539 Squadron RM as a support engineer for 2 years, 2 years on HMS Bulwark which was a Commando Carrier and worked closely with 40 and 42 Commando in San Carlos Landings during the Falklands conflict. Always known as Booties or Bootnecks never Boots. I’ve tried googling the term Boots in relation to Royal Marine nicknames and it always reverts to Bootneck in the search.

Lets agree to disagree on this.

Edited by Lawryleslie

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healdav
On 29/04/2018 at 10:15, PhilB said:

You give me great confidence in the Staff College and its graduates.:(

The other instructors were very good. They regarded this bloke with amusement

His best was when we were discussing studying history and someone came in. He said, "We were discussing histrionics; studying history".

 

And Boots were because they wore boots.

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