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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

18 pdr shell casing markings?


LarsA

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A friend has just bought this shell casing.

 

Obviously a british 18 pdr from 1918, but what can you tell from the other markings on the bottom and on the side?

 

TIA,

 

Lars

 

 

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0296B38F-DACF-4CDB-80CB-D7141B9DC1D0.jpeg

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I cannot help much but CF means Cordite Filled (Full Charge).  

 

V/R

 

Wayne

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The most interesting thing here are the stencilled markings on the side. These very rarely survive as souvenired cartridge cases usually end up being polished.

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The MkII case was manufactured in 1918 by Armstrong Whitworth, Birtley - denoted by the EOC monogram - but was rectified and refilled in 1927 to a MkVI standard. It might not have been fired. The rectification was carried out at Woolwich (RL in a rectangle) and involved low temperature annealing (A in a diamond) and scleroscope testing (S in a diamond). The Q denotes a case for a Quick Firing gun. Various Lot and inspection marks, but interesting the primer is either a blanking piece or electric - which would not be right for an 18pr.

 

The first line of the silver nitrate stencil on the side indicates nature (MD cordite), size (8) and lot of the propellant filling. The second line has the monogram of the filling station, and the date (month and year, 10/27) of filling. Bottom line indicates the latest numeral of the case.

 

 

 

265

Edited by 14276265
Propellant detail added
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14 hours ago, 14276265 said:

The MkII case was manufactured in 1918 by Armstrong Whitworth, Birtley - denoted by the EOC monogram - but was rectified and refilled in 1927 to a MkVI standard. It might not have been fired. The rectification was carried out at Woolwich (RL in a rectangle) and involved low temperature annealing (A in a diamond) and scleroscope testing (S in a diamond). The Q denotes a case for a Quick Firing gun. Various Lot and inspection marks, but interesting the primer is either a blanking piece or electric - which would not be right for an 18pr.

 

The first line of the silver nitrate stencil on the side indicates nature (MD cordite), size (8) and lot of the propellant filling. The second line has the monogram of the filling station, and the date (month and year, 10/27) of filling. Bottom line indicates the latest numeral of the case.

 

 

 

265

great reply sir. it's posters like you that make this board so interesting.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 4/26/2018 at 23:14, 14276265 said:

The MkII case was manufactured in 1918 by Armstrong Whitworth, Birtley - denoted by the EOC monogram - but was rectified and refilled in 1927 to a MkVI standard. It might not have been fired. The rectification was carried out at Woolwich (RL in a rectangle) and involved low temperature annealing (A in a diamond) and scleroscope testing (S in a diamond). The Q denotes a case for a Quick Firing gun. Various Lot and inspection marks, but interesting the primer is either a blanking piece or electric - which would not be right for an 18pr.

 

The first line of the silver nitrate stencil on the side indicates nature (MD cordite), size (8) and lot of the propellant filling. The second line has the monogram of the filling station, and the date (month and year, 10/27) of filling. Bottom line indicates the latest numeral of the case.

 

On 4/27/2018 at 14:09, free1954 said:

great reply sir. it's posters like you that make this board so interesting.

 

I quite agree! Shell cases are not especially my thing, but it is nice to live and learn!

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