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L/Cpl P E Walker KRRC Delhi Durbar


Sgt Stripes

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Hi. Could anyone please provide me with any information regarding L/Cpl 9082 P E Walker 3rd KRRC who sadly died on 1.9.1918 and is buried in Tourlaville cemetery. I know he was awarded the 1911 Delhi Durbar medal so he would have been in service at the start of the great war. Many Thanks.        

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not necessarily,  he could have left after 1911 and rejoined any some point beit before or after war broke out

Edited by Coldstreamer
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from soldiers died

 

Name: Percival Edwin Walker
Birth Place: Darlington
Death Date: 1 Sep 1918
Death Place: Balkans
Enlistment Place: Darlington
Rank: RFN. (L Corporal)
Regiment: King's Royal Rifle Corps
Battalion: 3rd Battalion
Regimental Number: 9082
Type of Casualty: Died
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Hi. Many thanks for this. The reference to his place of death from soldiers died is wrong. He is buried in Tourlaville.. I know the 3 KRRC served in the Balkans , could he have died coming home possible on a hospital ship ?. 

Edited by Sgt Stripes
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My Grandad, John Henry Riley (1888-1948), Rifleman 8903 3rd KRRC was also awarded the Indian Durbar Coronation Medal 1911. According to his discharge certificate, he enlisted at Manchester on 15 July 1908. I have a copy of a letter from him to his parents dated 3 October 1912, which indicates that he was serving with E Coy at Dagshai then, and believe that he was in Dagshai at the date of the 1911 census.

 

The only photo I have located of John (also known as Jack) during WW1 was probably taken to mark the occasion of his wedding in August 1915, however I have the following 2 photos which, according to my late Dad, were taken in India, and may be of interest to you.

KRRC in India1.JPG

KRRC in India2.jpg

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Super photographs Angela, many thanks for posting.

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23 hours ago, Sgt Stripes said:

Hi. Many thanks for this. The reference to his place of death from soldiers died is wrong. He is buried in Tourlaville.. I know the 3 KRRC served in the Balkans , could he have died coming home possible on a hospital ship ?.

 

Due to the threat from German U-boats, from Spring 1917 medical evacuations from Salonika used an overland route known as the Mediterranean Line of Communication.

 

It began at Cherbourg and extended down to Taranto in southern Italy and thence by ship to Greece and Egypt.

 

Formerly the medevac chain had gone from Marseilles all the way by ship.

 

See these diagrams from the Official History Medical Services Volume III, Chapter XVIII, facing pages 328 & 329 ...

594c74daa95b4_OHMedicalServicesIIIChXVII594c74d982874_OHMedicalServicesIIIChXVII

 

5ad601079eb50_OHMedicalServicesIIIChXVIII-MediterraneanLoCp328.jpg.3623085326efc2a919014c7e138af92f.jpg

 

 

Nearby text in that same volume gives further detail.

 

From Cherbourg, serious cases would normally continue on to the UK.  Either he died before crossing the Channel, or he reached the hospital or No.1 Rest Camp at Tourlaville (Cherbourg) and then died of something new acquired locally, such as influenza.  The former is probably the more likely.

 

The troops in the Salonika theatre were very badly impacted by malaria.

 

In answer to your Q re Walker dying at Cherbourg - YES, this is entirely consistent with a 3/KRRC rifleman being passed back down the medevac chain from Salonika/Macedonia.

 

Walker's BW&VM roll entry shows he only served overseas with 3/KRRC, but he has three lines in his entry suggesting he rejoined the battalion three times, which usually points to him being repatriated to the UK with wounds/sickness at least twice.  Such men were transferred for admin purposes to one of the KRRC Reserve battalions or to the Rifles Depot.  Once back to fighting fitness, the man would then be transferred back to his fighting battalion.

 

Mark

 

Edited by MBrockway
Map display corrected
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Thanks Mark for this really useful information. It makes sense to come overland and try to avoid U-Boats.    

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The seas around Salonika were still dangerous though - seven men from a leave party from 3/KRRC were drowned in Feb 1917 when the RFA Princess Alberta was sunk near Salonika.

 

She hit a mine laid by a German mine-laying submarine the previous day.

 

Mark

 

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