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Deutsche Schutzweste WW1


zuluwar2006
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On 16/07/2019 at 14:44, battle of loos said:

 

good morning,

 

a lot of years ago, I found this in an English trash can in Loos not far from "Chalk Pit Wood":

 

DSC_0007.JPG.9d4b29a414913fd42534bf72d80e0fde.JPG

 

 

is it a handmade mass? it consists of a sphere pierced by par. a chain is fixed by a bolt.

 

details:

 

1153204457_DSC_0002-Copie.JPG.3f7a7cea491cb7c8699fc7af89654c98.JPG1900058927_DSC_0006-Copie.JPG.859b6ddbcbe7d1c4d0a058494f91a9f1.JPG

 

 

I forgot to indicate the weight: 0.700 kg

 

regards

 

michel

Michel

Here are some photos from Trench club found in Treviso area from Ww1. 

We must think that the soldiers during ww1, used anything possible to kill the enemy.

Although we now have thoughts that some items used on Trench fights were usuless, on the field, soldiers feeled trust to themselves, with this kind of weapons, even if they proved a failure because it was difficult the use of them. 

But understand the psychologie of the soldier in the trenches and we can understand how the impossible look possible. 

Regards

D. 

VMhBG0m.jpg

dppHFgE.jpg

zJiv3xN.jpg

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good morning,

thank you for your opinion and example.

 

regards

 

miche

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On 19/07/2019 at 19:59, battle of loos said:

good morning,

thank you for your opinion and example.

 

regards

 

miche

Here is my last find.

 Splitterschutz für den Stahlhelm M16, absolutely original.

See the stiching of the leather to the mask itself.

Regards

D.

splitterschutz 1.jpg

splitterschutz 2.jpg

splitterschutz 3.jpg

splitterschutz 4.jpg

splitterschutz 5.jpg

splitterschutz 6.jpg

splitterschutz 7.jpg

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So when does the Museum of your's open up??

Very rare and very Expensive

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Pardon my ignorance, but is this faceplate hung on the helmet or is it strapped to the head? I'm assuming it attaches to the helmet somehow, as there's no way it could be attached comfortably, or securely, to the head.....

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good mornig,

 

great piece.
This is the first time I've seen this.

 

Thank you for the presentation.

 

Michel

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16 hours ago, Steve1871 said:

So when does the Museum of your's open up??

Very rare and very Expensive

Steve, 

You have a free pass on my museum😃

I am still laughing from your comment... 

Excellent sense of humor, as always... 

Regards

D. 

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14 hours ago, Joolz said:

Pardon my ignorance, but is this faceplate hung on the helmet or is it strapped to the head? I'm assuming it attaches to the helmet somehow, as there's no way it could be attached comfortably, or securely, to the head.....

Hello dear friend. 

This faceplate is attaching to the helmet from the visor of the helmet and then secured on the back of the helmet by the leather strap (the one is missing on this specimen). 

This is the proof that front line headquarters were experimented on how to protect soldiers from bomb splitters, as during ww1 the 65% to 70% (if I am not wrong) of casualties, were from bombardment and bomb splitters and not from bayonets or bullets. 

As experience gained fantasy on battle front, the protection of soldiers took several types of armor, and one extremely rare is this one (must be from the first types). 

The faceplate is attaching to the visor of the helmet, leaving 2 small lines for the eyes. 

This type of faceplate, is real heavy, long and it was uncomfortable for soldiers. 

During the war, Germans made more flexible faceplate and several types have been recorded. 

Regards

D. 

 

 

7 hours ago, battle of loos said:

good mornig,

 

great piece.
This is the first time I've seen this.

 

Thank you for the presentation.

 

Michel

Dear Michel, 

Indeed an extremely rare type of german ww1 faceplate, very rarely seen (only 2 have been recorded, as far as I know). 

Regards

D. 

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Different types of faceplate used by Germans during ww1. 

Regards

D. 5ac71d27725e0_mgmaskww1.jpg.a8522c452df7ef1f127ae9a667690914.jpg5ad0b72da7987_IMG_38951.JPG.eadfb2facc9d66d4495b70ae7329b32e.JPG5ad0b7420ccf3_IMG_38961.JPG.b22381d7c302ab47b9791213fb8cfe12.JPG5ad0b758ba6a5_IMG_38971.JPG.5fa0aec9b9e30b229d7169392458d7c0.JPG5ad0b769c6a25_IMG_38981.thumb.JPG.d111502b0cd9b584a1891da7a1ba5df5.JPGWW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-0-2048_10.10-644-0.jpg.ef682f7321a3a906e428f056abe1b45b.jpg479677891_ELEPHANT1.jpg.14f9f593b78aa46f2d70230645c16c0f.jpg1438078284_KETTENMASK2.jpg.ca193c36488e47edbfab65c3e8988a89.jpgKETTENMASK.jpg.c0985f5584dc40be605ddf9f576917bc.jpg1544316347_KETTENMASK8.jpg.a3ee4686cfc50ef727ee10ce83af96a6.jpg231541037_KETTENMASK5.jpg.34486d0bfa316456fcad669d51a48279.jpg952255544_brustpanzer1.jpg.c6f8c857b4808e1d207f9eca828aee23.jpg

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Some photos showing the use of the Grabenpanzer. 

The last photo is from a reanactor. 

Regards

D. 

62225538_1282206081935219_5054664219893126804_n.jpg

61051590_1707055479397654_5571513082701653084_n.jpg

64685890_434396517405411_7969230864677352069_n.jpg

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Thanks for the explanation, I see how it attaches now. The field of vision through the slots on these solid faceplates is truly miniscule. Coupled with the issue of relying upon the stability of your helmet to ensure that field of vision, I would expect these to be only suitable for those in static positions (machine gunners?). If your helmet slips down (or up) just a cm, you're blind, then you have to stop what you're doing, adjust your headgear, and then reacquire your target through that tiny slot.....they could have hardly been practical for anyone on the move....

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23 hours ago, Joolz said:

Thanks for the explanation, I see how it attaches now. The field of vision through the slots on these solid faceplates is truly miniscule. Coupled with the issue of relying upon the stability of your helmet to ensure that field of vision, I would expect these to be only suitable for those in static positions (machine gunners?). If your helmet slips down (or up) just a cm, you're blind, then you have to stop what you're doing, adjust your headgear, and then reacquire your target through that tiny slot.....they could have hardly been practical for anyone on the move....

I confirm totally your words. 

That is true. 

So experiments on the field, made the progress of german war machine and as a result we had the manufacturing of so many different faceplate models by german army. 

Regards

D. 

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Very impressive, but still say looks Midieval 

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Here are some more Ww1 german army masks. 

Regards

D. 

9487473c9beeac1959f500b73a55b730.jpg

C3_YMjBWYAAATnD.jpg

t8e2nbdz5h321.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Steve1871 said:

Very impressive, but still say looks Midieval 

Steve look at this photo.

October 1917: A present day soldier armed with a rifle shakes hands with a soldier in a full suit of armour armed with an axe. (Photo by Topical Press Agency/Getty Images)

3133912-1024x778.jpg

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"Brewster Body Shield"
When America made its entry into the first World War, it was an eye opener. War had changed drastically in only a few short years. Now, cavalry on horseback were useless against a machine gun nest.
America wanted some sort of protection for its infantrymen if they ever dared to cross the barrage of bullets that flew across No-Man's Land and they needed it as fast as they could. The U.S. Government turned to a man who created armor intended for boxing training, Dr. Guy Otis Brewster.

Dr. Brewster began creating a suit of armor that was made out of 0.21 inch chrome nickle steel — enough to withstand .303 British bullets at 2,700 ft/s (820 m/s). It was also given a V-shaped design to minimize the direct impact of any oncoming bullets. The whole thing came in two pieces and weighed a total of 110 lbs.

 Dr. Brewster invited Army officers and representatives from the steel mills and rubber companies to come witness. Being the insane scientist that he was, he donned the armor himself and stood in the firing line for the test.

His assistant swung at him with a hammer and a sledgehammer before eventually moving on to being shot by a Springfield rifle. He said that being shot it the suit was “only about one-tenth the shock as being struck by a sledgehammer.”

 

Despite its protective capabilities, it was deemed too heavy, too clumsy, and way too large to ever be fielded. 

In the end, he never managed to get the Body Shield approved by the U.S. government — seeing as it was impossibly immobile and occluded visibility almost entirely. He would, however, later make a steel-scaled waistcoat that resembles more modern flak vests. 

Watch the video from the testing of this Trench armor on this link

Armor2.jpg

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l038yvr5vw4y.jpg

Edited by zuluwar2006
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Damn That is American? Looks like something from Monty Python or Benny Hill

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27 minutes ago, Steve1871 said:

Damn That is American? Looks like something from Monty Python or Benny Hill

:lol:

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Still think you should open a all museum for all that body armor, trench clubs and all those rare Bayonet's 😁

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On 16/07/2019 at 14:44, battle of loos said:

 

good morning,

 

a lot of years ago, I found this in an English trash can in Loos not far from "Chalk Pit Wood":

 

DSC_0007.JPG.9d4b29a414913fd42534bf72d80e0fde.JPG

 

 

is it a handmade mass? it consists of a sphere pierced by par. a chain is fixed by a bolt.

 

details:

 

1153204457_DSC_0002-Copie.JPG.3f7a7cea491cb7c8699fc7af89654c98.JPG1900058927_DSC_0006-Copie.JPG.859b6ddbcbe7d1c4d0a058494f91a9f1.JPG

 

 

I forgot to indicate the weight: 0.700 kg

 

regards

 

michel

Dear Michel

Here is a photo from the museum at Dolomites front in Italy. 

Look carefully the Trench club on the upper right of the photo with the 3 spike heads. 

We must admit that soldiers during ww1, used anything it could harm or kill the enemy soldier. 

A Trench club like this one showing at the photo, is familiar with yours. 

The hope on any soldier, that he had an extra weapon to kill the enemy, forced the use of weapons which under other circumstances, the same users may believed them to be rediculous. 

But when you are inside "no man's land" , the impossible look possible and the hope to live one more day, guide you to use this kind of weapons, as result of a great frustration or other psychological effects. 

That is my humble opinion. 

Regards

D. 

 

1280px-WWI_maces_and_wirecutters_tre_sassi_museum.jpeg

Edited by zuluwar2006
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Good evening

 

Thanks for the photo.

beautiful panoply of trench club.

 

Michel

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Some more photos from Ww1 trench club, from Italian view... 

Regards

D. 

20051115235432_Immagine.jpg

200511180911_mazze ferrate 001.jpg

200511180744_mazze ferrate.jpg

2005116231944_Immagine1.jpg

2005116232047_Immagine3.jpg

20051115233150_Immagine.jpg

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On 23/06/2018 at 15:47, zuluwar2006 said:

MY LATEST FINDING

AN EXTREMELY RARE ELEPHANT WW1 SNIPER GERMAN MASK

ONLY 1500 MADE DURING THE WW1.

AN EXTREMELY RARE ITEM...

AT LAST, AFTER SO MANY YEARS OF SEEKING, IT IS MINE.

AND IT IS ABSOLUTELY ORIGINAL

REGARDS, D.

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-0-2048_10.10-644-0.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-thumb-4-130-86.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-3-720-532.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-2-720-319.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-7-720-708.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-5-720-370.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-6-720-70.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-4-720-86.jpg

WW1-German-Sniper-Elephant-Mask-full-7-720-708.jpg

Face shield aimed to protect sharpshooters from the enemy fire was made of solid steel. Due to its appearance French soldiers nicknamed it “Elephant shield” (“La plaque elephant”).

This shield provided additional protection to the left side of a sharpshooter’s face while left opened its right side for the sniper’s scope.

Two narrow short slots were situated in the upper part of the shield.

The shield was fixed around the head by leather straps that were riveted to the inner surface of the mask.

As those snipers’ masks were produced by various manufacturers several specimen are known differing in size, weight, steel quality and finish quality. Approximately 1,500 shields were issued.

Here is a rare photo with a British sniper with a captured Ww1 german sniper elephant mask, or Gesichtsmaske. 

Regards

D. 

p3ltygx8m0e21.jpg

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Congratulations Demitrios, Rhat is like the HOLY GRAIL of Trench Armor collecting, Right? Must have been expensive, but when the very rare comes up, either too expensive or it will be the only time you see one, You just have to jump on it. Great find, great condition . Have you any idea's on how you coung to display it ?

Exelent job👍😊

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20 hours ago, Steve1871 said:

Congratulations Demitrios, Rhat is like the HOLY GRAIL of Trench Armor collecting, Right? Must have been expensive, but when the very rare comes up, either too expensive or it will be the only time you see one, You just have to jump on it. Great find, great condition . Have you any idea's on how you coung to display it ?

Exelent job👍😊

Steve yes. 

This is something very rare and after a lot of years I finally got it and is original. 

A lot of fakes are coming around for a lot of money. 

A collector from GB bought last year one elephant mask for 2500 euros. When I saw it I told him asap that it was a fake one. He almost got a hurt attack. 

 

Two photos showing the use of Grabenpanzer and stirpanzer during ww1, by the German soldiers. 

Regards

D. 

56285388_421878031911347_5092956081257873311_n.jpg

54800794_107768416946970_8360109459102944266_n.jpg

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