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trajan

Two Ottoman officers in the Vosges in May-June 1918

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David Filsell

I can add nothing to this thread, other than say what a terrific collaborative work. Thanks guys.

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GreyC

Feldbahn-Amt /Feldbahnamt Habsheim see:

https://www.gda.bayern.de/findmitteldb/Archivalie/345524/

 

Tätigkeitsbericht des Feldbahn-Maschinenamts Habsheim for 1918

For Vermessungs-Abteilung 13:

https://www2.landesarchiv-bw.de/ofs21/olf/struktur.php?bestand=5735&klassi=001.001.003&anzeigeKlassi=001.001.001&letztesLimit=unbegrenzt&baumSuche=&standort=

 

Ma Bü 28 and explicitly 29

 

 

 

GreyC

 

Edited by GreyC

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trajan
12 hours ago, JulianR said:

I would translate Kleinbahn as narrow gauge, Benzol train I think means an locomotive using petrol (benzine) as fuel, 

 

Thanks Julian - I agree. I do need to revise my translations!

 

Julian

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trajan
11 hours ago, JulianR said:

Map scale is 1:50,000 and I am fairly sure that Amt in German means an Office, more I think in terms of an organisation rather than necessarily a physical one, so we have some sort of area office.

 

Julian

 

I am thinking Feldbahn Amt and so 'Field railway office'...? I think it is on one of the maps - I'll try to check later, my turn to supervise and taxi-service for our two boys! 

 

EDIT 1: And DavidF, yes, indeed, superb input from so many individuals here has really helped!

 

EDIT 2: Ah, I see GreyC got it - post 202... Should have caught up with all these posts as they came in!

Edited by trajan

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eisenbahn.tv

The Germans differd three types of railways:


"Vollbahn": standard gaugae railway

"Kleinbahn" or "Feldbahn" (sometines "Feldeisenbahn") narrow gauge railway - with locomotive traction

"Förderbahn": narrow gauge railway with man or horse (donkey, ox) traction.

 

Sometimes "Kleinbahn" is used for already existing narrow gauage railway, and "Feldbahn" for newly constructed light railways for military use...

 

Regards Gabriel

Edited by eisenbahn.tv

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JulianR

I passed on a link to this thread to various of my railway friends and have had a comprehenisive answer from one.

 

Vollbahn means simply a full-scale railway, i.e. standard gauge; Kleinbahn means either a minor railway to standard gauge (built with lighter rails, lighter infrastructure, for slower speeds - we would say a Light Railway ) -  or a small-scale railway - as we know small-scale refers not just to the gauge of the track but to the size of the locos and rolling stock. Feldbahn means a railway built ''in the field'' either for agricultural or (later) military purposes, designed to be short-term and is of course almost always narrow-gauge - here 70cm rather than 60cm. . So that reference to a three-rail section means that there was a standard gauge line with a narrow gauge line either inside it or using - as in this case - using one of the rails which means that when the n.g. diverged one of the s,g. rails had to have either an opening cut in or (more likely) the n.g. somehow climbed up and over with a removeable section. At one point the translator uses 'third rail section' but this is misleading for English readers as it normally implies for us a third electrified rail; here it simply means a section of track where they have laid a narrow.-gauge rail inside the standard gauge ones (like a part fo the Vivarais line at Tournon) to save building a new alignment at great effort.

 

That 4w petrol (or Benzol) loco by the fountain is I think an Oberursel (this is a town north-west of Frankfurt/Main) Feldbahn loco. Schienanfahrzeug is simply a railway motive power item, Kraftfahrzeug a road equivalent, so we could think of a motorised trolley perhaps, and a motor car.

 

To the Ottoman officer: Hicaz means what we would write Hejaz or Hedjaz.

 

Do not overlook that at this period in summer 1918 there was a vast cooperation on railway matters between the Germans and the Ottomans, German compressed-air locos were working n.g. through the incompleted tunnels in the Taurus and Amanus mountains, German railway troops were also in Palestine and Syria. So it would be quite in order for a delegation of Engineering officers to be shown the latest uses and machinery that had been developed - cable cars, internal-combustion locos, loading equipment, etc. - to handle logistics, troop movements, access to timber or minerals etc. The Germans had been in the Vosges some time by now and had clearly built some substantial railways, not specifically for short-term combat purposes,  of which they were justifiably proud.  7m high 'Anschlussdämme' are connecting embankments rising to meet the canal bridge and represent some significant earth-moving and probably without machinery to help.

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eisenbahn.tv

slightly off topic: I've got old photographs of a German engineer taken in the 1930s showing the construction of the Railway Kütahya - Balikesir. Made a audio slideshow:

 

slideshow at Youtube

 

Gabriel

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