Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
yperman

Front line priests

Recommended Posts

Wexflyer

From an MA thesis by J.M. Brennan, available online:

"The portrait of the Irish Catholic Chaplain as brave, selfless and even saintly suited the British military authorities and the Catholic Church in Britain. These stories of extraordinary bravery helped the Catholic cause in Britain and were used to improve recruitment in Ireland. They were also used to counter anti-war sentiments in the American newspapers. In May 1916 Fr. Bernard Rawlinson wrote to Fr. Gill asking him to provide him with personal experiences of front line chaplains to publish in Irish and American newspapers to aid recruitment. He said he had been asked for this by the ‘Intelligence Dept.’122

I believe Fr. Rawlinson was the Chief Catholic chaplain to the British Army in WWI.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
michaeldr
7 hours ago, Wexflyer said:

I believe Fr. Rawlinson was the Chief Catholic chaplain to the British Army in WWI.

 

Correct

This from Johnstone & Hagerty

5a3108a296c1b_FrRawlinsonfrmCrossontheSword.jpg.2cbad3c42caab256ca0905a99aa0aa99.jpg

 

Edited by michaeldr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nigelcave
On 12/12/2017 at 13:28, CROONAERT said:

 

Very true on both counts with many serving on attachment to the Service de santé (officers only) or the Sections d'Infirmiers Militaires (other ranks). Interestingly, due to their 'everyday roles' within the French army, most French priests during the war were armed!

 

Below is an image of a French priest/chaplain named Renaud (on the left, rolling a fag!) serving as a sergent (or Infirmier-chef) in a Section d'Infirmiers Militaire at the Ouvrage de Froideterre near Verdun in 1916...

 

Dave. (PS The attached chart illustrates the numbers of French clergy involved in the war... the first column indicates the numbers mobilised into the military, the second illustrates the deaths)

 

 

Image6.jpg

And to put those figures in context: the first figure is for diocesan clergy, the second is for ordained members of male religious orders and the third is for religious brothers, i.e. members of a religious order who are not ordained priest.

Edited by nigelcave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
pagius
On 12/13/2017 at 03:35, Wexflyer said:

From an MA thesis by J.M. Brennan, available online:

"The portrait of the Irish Catholic Chaplain as brave, selfless and even saintly suited the British military authorities and the Catholic Church in Britain. These stories of extraordinary bravery helped the Catholic cause in Britain and were used to improve recruitment in Ireland. They were also used to counter anti-war sentiments in the American newspapers. In May 1916 Fr. Bernard Rawlinson wrote to Fr. Gill asking him to provide him with personal experiences of front line chaplains to publish in Irish and American newspapers to aid recruitment. He said he had been asked for this by the ‘Intelligence Dept.’122

I believe Fr. Rawlinson was the Chief Catholic chaplain to the British Army in WWI.

 

A lot about Rawlinson in this article ...     http://www.monlib.org.uk/papers/ebch/1998hagerty.pdf

 

He was my g-uncle Dom Ambrose's boss    http://agiusww1.com/tancred/    and before the war he was secretary to my g-g-uncle Archbishop Agius in Manila !

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambrose_Agius

 

 

Downside 200 Monks - Rawlinson.jpg

Rawlinson 1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...