Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
MrSwan

"Sick, lame, and lazy - fall out"

Recommended Posts

MrSwan

Drawing on memories from my army days I recall the expression "sick, lame, and lazy" being used as a description for those who, at first parade, were feeling unwell and wished to avail themselves of the opportunity to attend the medical officer at sick parade.

 

I would be interested to see how far back this expression goes, and especially if it was used during the First World War. As with so much of regimental medical history these little details go unrecorded, but has anyone seen this phrase used in letters, diaries or other references?

 

Many thanks.

 

Jonathan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gem22

Jon

I remember that from the '60s and another was on Sunday parades I had to put up with 'Catholics, Jews, and Others' fall out. It wouldn't be allowed today because it's not kosher!

 

Garth

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sassenach

It was used in the 60s by my school PT master, who was a wartime RAF man. Referred to anyone who was "excused" PT.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Steven Broomfield

As with Sassenach, my PE teacher used it, as did my old man (1938 enlistment)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
IPT

There was an 1844 book - "HINTS TO THE SICK, THE LAME, AND THE LAZY; or, Passages in the Life of a Hydropathist. By a Veteran. With illustrations, by a Recruit. 

 

Also in newspapers;

 

1816 -  "Money cannot save. If is sick, or lame, or lazy, he has no workhouse to resort to"

1837 - "Every regiment shall have two carts for its sick, lame, and lazy"

1879 - "The Dhoolies, containing the sick, lame, and lazy, followed in the wake of the regiment."

1895 - "There the surgeons overhaul the sick, lame, and lazy, anti send them to their depots about their business"

1907 - "had the honour of taking the sick, lame, and lazy for medical inspection"

1916 - "informs the platoon that every man, sick, lame, or lazy, will take an active part in to-day’s digging operations"

 

There is a reference in 1917 to a soldier's song - "Come the sick, the lame the lazy" sung in connection with the sick call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MrSwan

All - thanks for the various confirmations of the use of the expression over time.

 

IPT - many thanks for your documentary sources. If you have been using the British Newspaper Archive your ability to direct their search engine is far better than mine!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...